The Holmes Archive of Electronic Music
Vintage Dutch Electronic Music

Vintage Dutch Electronic Music

May 30, 2021

Episode 44

Vintage Dutch Electronic Music

Playlist

  1. Hans Kox, “Three Pieces For Electronic Organ” from Anthology Of Dutch Electronic Tape Music: Volume 1 (1955-1966) (1978 Composer’s Voice). Tape piece from 1955 recorded at the Studio of The Netherlands Radio Union. An early demonstration of tape editing techniques created in a makeshift studio, using an electronic organ as the main audio signal. 3:56
  2. Ton De Leeuw, “Study” from Anthology Of Dutch Electronic Tape Music: Volume 1 (1955-1966) (1978 Composer’s Voice). Tape piece from 1957 recorded at the Studio of The Netherlands Radio Union. Composed using serial techniques and a 31-interval scale. 6:57
  3. Henk Badings, “Genese” from Electronic Music (1960 Philips). Tape piece from 1958 for five audio-frequency oscillators. From the Philips Studios (Eindhoven, The Netherlands). 9:55
  4. Dick Raaijmakers, “Contrasts” from Electronic Music (1960 Philips). Tape piece from 1959 for Ondes Martenot, Pulse-generator with resonance circuits, Noise-generator, Octave- and Half Octave-filters. From the Philips Studios (Eindhoven, The Netherlands). 4:49
  5. Frits C. Weiland, “Studie In Lagen En Impulsen” from Anthology Of Dutch Electronic Tape Music: Volume 1 (1955-1966) (1978 Composer’s Voice). Tape piece from 1961 and the Studio of Utrecht University. A purely work with time suspended in layers of sound. 4:54
  6. Tom Dissevelt, “Gamelan” from Anthology Of Dutch Electronic Tape Music: Volume 1 (1955-1966) (1978 Composer’s Voice). Tape music from 1963-64 created at the Studio of Utrecht University. An electronic simulation of the rhythmic effects of gamelan music. 3:12
  7. Gorter, “K 45” from Anthology Of Dutch Electronic Tape Music: Volume 1 (1955-1966) (1978 Composer’s Voice). Tape piece from 1964-65 created at the CEM Studio, Bilthoven. Created in class taught by Gottfried Michael Koenig. “Starting from basic material of ten chords each, consisting of four sine-wave tones, an end product was achieved in twenty-nine phases by means of transposition, synchronization, rhythm, “chopping up,’ reverberation, reversal, filtering, ring modulation, dynamics, etc. used individually or in combination.” (Klaus Gorter). 5:46
  8. Dick Raaijmakers, “Canons 1-2” from Ballad 'Erlkönig'/5 Canons (1981 Composers' Voice). Tape piece from 1967. Realized in the studio of the Royal Conservatory of The Hague. 10:32
  9. Gottfried Michael Koenig, “Funktion Grün” from Terminus II/Funktion Grün/Phonothese/Chants De Maldoror (1970 DGG). Tape piece from 1967. Realized at the Studio for Electronic Music at the Utrecht State University. Construction and the order of the sounds was “calculated by a computer.” 8:13
  10. Ekseption, “Epilogue” and “Finale: Music for Mind/Theme Julia” from Beggar Julia's Time Trip (1970 Philips). Piano, Spinet, Xylophone, Hammond], Pipe Organ, Mellotron, Percussion, Rick Van Der Linden; Guest, Alto Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone, Tonytone, Percussion, Electronic Effects, Tony Vos; Bass, Cor Dekker; Drums, Kettle drums, Dennis Whitebread; Tenor Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone, Flute – Dick Remelink; Trumpet, Pocket Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Rein Van Den Broek; Vocals, Percussion – Michel Van Dijk; Engineer, Electronic Effects, Jan Schuurman; Recording, Mixing Engineer, Electronic effects, Gerard Beckers. Made in Holland. I’m not sure what the “Tonytone” instrument is. Perhaps the Theremin-like sound heard on this track? Or was that a sliding note on a synthesizer? 4:56
  11. Jurriaan Andriessen, opening four-track sequence, “She Walks In Beauty,” “Overtones,” “Beyond the Veil” and “Roundelay” from The Awakening Dream (1977 Park). Dreamy progressive rock solo album recorded in 1977 at Dream-Studio, The Hague. Moog, Minimoog, Fender Rhodes, Hohner Clavinet, Organ, Acoustic Grand Piano, Jurriaan Andriessen. “A trance symphony composed by Jurriaan Andriessen.” 12:23
  12. Ton Bruynèl, “Translucent II” from Ton Bruynèl (1981 Composers' Voice). “Translucent II” for orchestra & tape (1977-78) recorded on in 1978 by the Netherlands broadcasting organization (NOS). Electronic realizations created at Bruynèl’s private studio. Symphony parts performed by the Utrecht Symphony Orchestra. 9:44
  13. André De Koning, “Nieuws In Het Kort” from Contactdisc 1 (1983 Stichting Stopcontact). This track is from a compilation of mostly Dutch artists. Voice, noise, and rock. 2:02
  14. Doxa Sinistra, “Portable Electronics” from Contactdisc 1 (1983 Stichting Stopcontact). This track is from a compilation of mostly Dutch artists. Electronic rock in the style of Cabaret Voltaire. 3:04

Background music used during this episode:

Tom Dissevelt, “Whirwinds (Torbellinos)” from The Fascinating World Of Electronic Music (1959 Philips). Tape music realized at the Philips Studios (Eindhoven, The Netherlands). Also known as “Whirling” and “Sonik Re-entry” on some English pressings. 2:33

Link to the Institute of Sonology, Royal Conservatoire The Hague.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog Noise and Notations.

A Conversation with Pamela Z

A Conversation with Pamela Z

May 23, 2021

Episode 43

A Conversation with Pamela Z

Music in the Time of Pandemic

 

Playlist

  1. TIMES3 (TIMES X TIMES X TIMES), commissioned by The Prototype Project (2021). Composer Pamela Z and theatre artist Geoff Sobelle collaborate on a site-specific sonic journey through Times Square – past, present and imagined… What was this place? Composed by Pamela Z; written by Geoff Sobelle; instrumentalists, Tom Dambly, Crystal Pascucci, Todd Reynolds; vocals, Pamela Z; voices sampled from Eric Sanderson, Alan Weisman, Robyn Orlin, Lisa McGinn, Stefanie Sobelle, Craig Dykers, Erick Gregory, Colleen Jennings-Roggensack, Jack Tchen, Adrienne Brown, Pamela Z, and Geoff Sobelle.

Background music used during this episode (exceprts):

  • Pamela Z, "Quatre Couches" in a solo concert as part of VoxLab Vårfest at Vega Scene in Oslo, Norway, on April 11, 2019. Pamela Z, electronics and voice processing using MAX MSP gesture-controlled MIDI instruments.
  • Pamela Z, “Three Vertical Kilns (Carbon Song Cycle)” Live at BAM/PFA (April 12, 2013). Excerpt from the complete performance of Carbon Song Cycle, a work for chamber ensemble and expanded cinema by composer Pamela Z and video artist Christina McPhee.
  • Ink: commissioned and presented by VOLTI (2021); artistic director Robert Geary; executive producer Barbara Heroux; performed by VOLTI. Music and video by Pamela Z.
  • TIMES3 (TIMES X TIMES X TIMES), commissioned by The Prototype Project (2021). Composer Pamela Z and theatre artist Geoff Sobelle collaborate on a site-specific sonic journey through Times Square – past, present and imagined… What was this place?
  • Pamela Z, “Badagada”from A Delay Is Better (2004 Starkland). Composed by, recorded by, performer, producer, liner notes, Pamela Z.

Additional works and links for Pamela Z:

  • Website for Pamela Z
  • TIMES3 (TIMES X TIMES X TIMES), commissioned by The Prototype Project (2021). Composer Pamela Z and theatre artist Geoff Sobelle collaborate on a site-specific sonic journey through Times Square – past, present and imagined… What was this place?
  • Ink: commissioned and presented by VOLTI (2021); artistic director Robert Geary; executive producer Barbara Heroux; performed by VOLTI. Music and video by Pamela Z.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog Noise and Notations.

 

New Arrivals to the Archives

New Arrivals to the Archives

May 16, 2021

Episode 42

New Arrivals to the Archives

New-Old Recordings Making it into the Archives

Playlist

  1. Vincenzo Agnetti, “Pieces Of Sound” from Revolutions Per Minute (The Art Record) (1982 Ronald Feldman Fine Arts Inc.). Reading and tape composition by Italian artist, photographer and writer Vincenzo Agnetti. 4:38
  2. Chris Burden, “The Atomic Alphabet” from Revolutions Per Minute (The Art Record) (1982 Ronald Feldman Fine Arts Inc.). Solo poetry piece by Chris Burden. 0:31
  3. Canarios, “Genesis” and “Prana” from Ciclos (1974 Ariola). Spanish album of symphonic space rock. Adapted by E. Bautista (from Vivaldi’s Four Seasons); Bass, Synthesizer, Theremin, Christian Mellies; Drums, Electronic Drums (Moog), Timbales, Triangle, Vocals, Castanets, Maracas, Bells, Temple Bells, Flexotone, Glockenspiel, Rototoms, Gongs, Percussion (Bambus), Goblet Drum (Dharbuka), Alain Richard; Electric Piano, Hammond Organ,Piano, Violin, Mathias Sanveillan; Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Lyre, Echoplex, Phase Shifter, Vocals, Antonio García De Diego; Synthesizer, Keyboards, Mellotron, Digital Frequency Meter, Ribbon Controller, Vocals,Teddy Bautista. This is pretty audacious. 7:22
  4. Holger Czukay, “Ho-Mai-Nhi (The Boat Woman Song)” from Technical Space Composer's Crew ‎– Canaxis 5 (1969/ RE 2018). Basic tape composition work from this German pioneer, circa 1968. Originally privately released in 1969 by Technical Space Composer's Crew and titled "Canaxis 5". Later reissued as "Canaxis" by Holger Czukay and Rolf Dammers. Czukay studied under Karlheinz Stockhausen from 1963–1966, and in 1968 co-founded the German rock group Can. 7:31
  5. Deuter, “Atlantis” from D (1971 Kuckuck). Georg Deuter, produced and composed on tape. Early work from this German ambient, electronic composer. 6:04
  6. Far East Family Band, “The God Of Wind,” “Moving, Looking, Trying, Jumping In A Maze,” “Wa, Wa (Yamato)” from The Cave: Down To The Earth (1975 Mu Land). Bass, Akira Fukakusa; Drums, Shizuo Takasaki; Guitar, Fumio Miyashita, Hirohito Fukushima; Keyboards, Akira Ito, Fumio Miyashita, Masanori Takahashi; Percussion, Masanori Takahashi; Vocals, Hirohito Fukushima. Japanese psychedelic jam band. Spacey, fun, rollicking organs and guitars. 4:53
  7. Langston Hughes, conclusion of Rhythms Of The World (1955 Folkways). African American poet and author Hughes narrated this work based on his book "The First Book of Rhymes.” The “documentary sounds” were field recordings used to underscore the poetry. 5:08
  8. Steve Hackett, “Jacuzzi” from Defector (1980 Charisma). Solo album from guitarist for Genesis. This is a track of largely keyboard-like sounds featuring such instruments as the Matell Optigan and Roland GR500 Guitar Synthesizer, played by Hackett. Bass, Dik Cadbury; Concert Flute, Alto Flute, John Hackett; and keyboards by Nick Magnus. 4:37
  9. Pedro Morquecho, “Mi Corazon Es Un Violin (Fox)” from Pedro Morquecho (Su Novacord Y Su Orquesta) (1965 Orfeon). Mexican keyboard artist who found his groove with the amazing Hammond Novachord. Here he plays some numbers for the night life, popular favorites designated for different kinds of dances, such as Afro-Beguine, Fox, and Rhumba. 3:33
  10. Enoch Light And The Light Brigade, “Swamp-Fire” from Dimension •3• (1964 Command). This is one of the many amazing instrumental albums produced by Enoch Light for Command in the sixties. In this case, we have Dick Hyman on organ, Tony Mottola on guitar and Alto Saxophone by Walt Levinsky. I also hear an uncredited appearance by an Ondioline, a monophonic organ known to be used by Enoch Light on many albums. 2:19
  11. Akira Itoh, “Life from the Light 光からの生命” from Inner Light Of Life / やすらぎを、君に (1978 King Records). Alto Saxophone, Flute, Vocals – Noboru Kimura; Electric Bass – Keiju Ishikawa; Electric Guitar, Vocals – Nobuo Hajime; Piano, Vocals – Kenji Kijo; Synthesizer – Akira Ito; Vocals – Goko Kunikida. Ito was previously a member of the Far East Family Band (see earlier track). 6:53
  12. Alain Markusfeld, “1st movement” from Contemporus (1979 Egg). French singer and songwriter. Composed by, arranged By, ARP Polyphonic, ARP Prosoloist, Acoustic Piano, electric guitar, Organ, Percussion, Cymbals, Triangle, Marimbas, Harmonica, Handclaps, Vocals – Alain Markusfeld; vocals Patricia Markusfeld. 3:06
  13. Masquerade, “Guardian Angel” from Masquerade ‎– Guardian Angel (1983 Metronome). PPG Waveterm synthesizer, Chris Evans. I don’t know much about this group, other than this song and it was basically one person playing the instruments, the short-lived PPG Wave synthesizer, also used by Gary Numan, Depeche Mode, among others. 4:27
  14. Bruno Menny, “Orbite Autour De La Planète 3” from Cosmographie (1972 Arion). This is unique album from the engineer who was also a student of composer Iannis Xenakis. This is his only album. It is a blend of concrete and synthesized sounds. 19:12
  15. Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark, “Maid Of Orleans (The Waltz Joan Of Arc)” from Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark (1981 Dindisc). A 7-inch single. Bass, Guitar, Horns, Mellotron, Organ, Percussion (Acoustic, Electronic), rhythm program, Synthesizer, Vocals, Andrew McCluskey; Drums, Percussion (Acoustic, Electronic), Synthesizer Bass, Malcolm Holmes; Mellotron, Melodica, Organ, Percussion (Acoustic, Electronic), Piano, rhythm program, Synthesizer, Vocals, Paul Humphreys; Organ, Piano, Synthesizer, Michael Douglas. 4:12
  16. Harold L. O'Neal Jr. (producer), “Ultimate Obstacle (All Tests Simultaneously)” from RCOA Stereo Systems Test Record (1972 Yorkshire Records). Test record using electronic sounds and tone clusters, bursts. “The Ultimate High-Fidelity Test Record.” 2:04
  17. Karlheinz Stockhausen, “Mikrophonie I” (1964), first part, from Mikrophonie I & II / Prozession (1969 CBS). From France comes this boxed set. Electronics (Filters), Hugh Davies, Jaap Spek, Karlheinz Stockhausen; Electronics (Microphone) – Harald Boje*, Johannes G. Fritsch; Percussion (Tam-tam), Alfred Alings, Aloys Kontarsky. Mikrophonie I for Tamtam, Two Microphones, Two Filters and Potentiometers Essentially, a piece for cardboard tubes scraped on cymbals and mixed with electronic amplification and reverberation. Hugh Davies worked with Stockhausen during this period. Recorded at West German Radio Studios, Cologne, December 17 & 18, 1965. 7:24
  18. Donna Summer, “Grand Illusion” from The Wanderer (1980 Geffen). Words and vocals by Donna Summer; Music by Giorgio Moroder; Synthesizers, Harold Faltermeyer, Sylvester Levay; Guitar, Jeff Baxter, Steve Lukather, Tim May; Drums, Percussion, Keith Forsey; Bass Guitar, John Pierce, Lee Sklar, Les Hurdle. 3:50
  19. Ruth White, David White, Gary Maynard, Animals Are Wonderful (1982 Tom Thumb Records). Synthesizers, Ruth White. Yes, that’s the Ruth White of sixties Moog Modular fame. She also made her way with children’s activity records such as this. 2:16

 

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog Noise and Notations.

 

Sounds for Museums

Sounds for Museums

May 9, 2021

Episode 41

Sounds for Museums

Sound Art to Accompany Exhibits

Playlist

  1. François Baschet, Bernard Baschet, and Jacques Lasry, “Sonatine (3 Mouvements)” from Structures for Sound (1965 BAM). The exhibition 'Structures For Sound-Musical Instruments' by François and Bernard Baschet was shown at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, from October 4 to December 5, 1965. Although not heard in the exhibit, this set of compositions was co-marketed by the museum and BAM and clearly intended as a takeaway souvenir. The recordings were made in France, and released there as Les Structures Sonores Lasry-Baschet, then repackaged for the US market and exhibit. The piece was written by Jacques Lasry.
  2. Various Artists, Art By Telephone (1969 Museum Of Contemporary Art Chicago). Artists were asked to phone-in instructions for a work of art to be exhibited at Art by Telephone, held at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. The museum released a recording of the phone calls and sold it at the exhibit. Here are four excerpts by John Giorno, Dick Higgins, Sol Lewitt, Richard Serra, and Jack Burnham. In total, 38 artists provided instructions that were included on the album.
  3. Audio Arts: Volume 3 No 4 Side A (1977 Audio Arts). Excerpts from a radio work by John Carson broadcast by Downtown Radio, Belfast in 1977. The program was a compilation of recordings made in June 1977 at Documenta VI, an international exhibition of contemporary art in Kassel, West Germany. We hear two excerpts, the first from artist Wolf Vostell which opens with the sound of bubbling water and the second a sound work by Achim Freyer. These audio works played in the exhibit. Other portions of the complete cassette recordings alternated between statements/interviews and sound environments/installations. Audio Arts was a magazine in continuous publication for 33 years and ran to 24 volumes, each of four issues.
  4. Various artists, from Sound (1979 Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art). Four of the tracks from this collection are included: Terry Fox, “Labyrinth Scored For II Cats” (1979); Jim Gordon, “Piece For Synthesizers, Computers And Other Instruments” (1979); Doug Hollis, “Aeolian Harp” (1975-76), composed 1975-76 at the San Francisco Exploratorium; Bill Fontana, “Kirribilli Wharf” (1979). Album produced for SOUND. An exhibition of sound sculpture, instrument building and acoustically tuned spaces. Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art July 14-August 31, 1979. P.S.I. New York, September 30-November 18, 1979.
  5. Jeff Gordon, “Everyone’s An Artist” (1984). Vocal Jeff Gordon and Mug Maruyama; Programming, Graham Hawthorne; Emulators/Keyboards, Jeff Gordon. Gordon produced Revolutions Per Minute (The Art Record), a collection of audio tracks by artists released as a double LP. This track by Gordon was not included in that release but I think was used for a traveling exhibition featuring sound, The RPM Touring Exhibitions, designed by Gordon and his wife Juanita, that toured the US and Europe for over four years, including The Tate Museum in London.
  6. Laurie Anderson, “The telephone,” “The polaroid,” “The sheet,” “The wedding dress,” “The bathrobe” from La Visite Guidée (1994). Music: Laurie Anderson; Voice: Sophie Calle. Exhibition catalogue consisting of artist’s book and Audio CD published in conjunction with the show held March 27- 29, 1994. The work consisted of a total of 21 short compositions. We hear five consecutive tracks from the collection. This audio was provided on a cassette for the exhibit, which visitor’s played on a Sony Walkman while taking a guided tour of the Sophie Calle's exhibition Absent.
  7. Steven Vitiello. World Trade Center Recordings: Open House Bounce (1999). A recording from the 91st floor of the World Trade Center, Tower One made with contact microphones placed on the inside of the windows. This recording was only published as part of a CDR sold at an Open House Exhibition in the fall of 1999. Various recordings were made during a 6-month residency. This one in particular picked up a number of passing planes and helicopters.
  8. Various artists, Whitney Biennial 2002 (2002 Whitney Museum Of American Art). A CD was included with the 292-page hardcover catalogue "Whitney Biennial 2002" published for the same-titled exhibition at the Whitney Museum Of American Art, March 7-May 26, 2002. Four tracks are heard: Maryanne Amacher, “A Step Into It, Imagining 1001 Years Entering Ancient Rooms” (excerpt); Meredith Monk, “Eclipse,” with performers Ching Gonzalez, Katie Geissinger, Meredith Monk, Theo Bleckmann; Marina Rosenfeld, “Delusional Dub;” Tracie Morris, “Slave Sho' To Video A.k.a. Black But Beautiful.”
  9. 33 RPM: Ten Hours of Sound From France (2003 235). Exhibition companion compilation to San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Sept. 6-14, 2003, listening room program. 33 RPM consisted of ten one-hour segments that were played on a rotating schedule at the museum during the exhibition. This was the fourth installment of an ongoing series at the museum that presented sound art scene in a variety of countries. We include the following tracks from this compilation: Kasper T. Toeplitz, “PURR#2” (2003); Jean-Claude Risset, “Resonant Sound Spaces/Filters” (2002); Mimetic, “evolution” (2003); and Lionel Marchetti, “À rebours” (1989).
  10. Jane Philbrick, "Voix/e" (2003-04 SW Harbor Songline). Installation two lightboxes, with color Duratrans (large-format backlit color transparency film), 48 x 24 x 6; two inset Alpine speakers, synthesized voice track, 9 1/2 mins. looped.; two companion LCD-screen DVDs. On view at Real Art Ways, Hartford, CT, and Consolidated Works, Seattle (2004). Audio work created by Jan Philbrick at the Center for Spoken Language Understanding, Oregon Graduate Institute. The piece consists of Philbrick’s reading of the "Song of Solomon," modified and edited using voice-gendered speech synthesis to speak bride, groom, and companion parts.
  11. Marko Timlin, “Audible Light” (2017), Created by Marko Timlin, a Finnish sound artist whose work has frequently been integrated into museum installations. This installation, Audible Light, created sound directly out of light, “work inspired by Evgeny Sholpo's Variophone instrument developed in 1930.” Solo exhibition, Oksasenkatu 11 in Helsinki. Not to be confused with the 2000 museum exhibition called Audible Light at the Museum Of Modern Art, Oxford, to be featured in a future podcast.

Opening montage: sounds from the recordings of Art By Telephone (1969 Museum Of Contemporary Art Chicago) and Audio Arts: Volume 3 No 4 Side A, cassette (1977 Audio Arts).

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog Noise and Notations.

Monophonic Imagination: A Conversation with Sound Artist Aki Onda

Monophonic Imagination: A Conversation with Sound Artist Aki Onda

May 2, 2021

Episode 40

Monophonic Imagination: A Conversation with Sound Artist Aki Onda

Playlist

  1. Aki Onda, Silence Prevails: East Village Community Gardens During the Pandemic 2020 (2021 Private). Recorded in the City Gardens of the East Village in New York City during the pandemic. All sounds recorded by Aki Onda by using Sony portable cassette recorder.

Sequence starting times:

  1. Campos Community Garden (0:00~)
  2. La Plaza Cultural de Armando Perez Community Garden (7:64~)
  3. El Sol Brillante (14:19~)
  4. El Jardin del Paraiso (17:58~)
  5. 9th Street Community Garden Park (23:07~)
  6. Le Petit Versailles (30:28~ includes music performed by NYOBS)
  7. Lower East Side Ecology Center Community Garden (33:36~)
  1. José Maceda, “Ugnayan” (excerpt) (2009 Tzadik). Music for 20 radio stations. Original recording from 197 Kolitong (zither), Bungbung (horn), Ongiyung (flute), Bangibang, Balingbing (percussion), Agung, Echo Gong, Chinese Cymbals, José Maceda; Executive-Producer, John Zorn; Zither, Horn, Flute, Percussion, Gong, Cymbal, Antonio Regalario, Arsenio Nicolas, Jr., Fabian Obispo, Felicidad Prudente, Josefina Arrieta, Nita Abrogar, Ruben Federizon. From the liner notes: “This release is a stereo mix of the original twenty tracks recorded under the supervision of the composer in 1973 in the Philippines. The recording sessions took place in the studio of Radio Veritas, the Catholic church radio station, which eventually was used in 1986 by the "People Power" movement to organize resistance to the Marcos dictatorship, and became known as "Radio Bandido" because it kept moving its transmitters so that the military could not not locate them.”

Background music by Aki Onda: Aki Onda, “It’s Gone” from Beautiful Contradiction (1998 All Access). Composed by, samples, programming, field recordings (cassette recorder), Aki Onda; Keyboards, Syunya Mori.

Background music during segment on José Maceda: José Maceda, “Strata” (excerpt) from Drone and Melody (2007 Tzadik). Composition from 1987, released on John Zorn label. Conductors, Ramôn P. Santos and Steed Cowart; Performed by The Mills Performing Group and the Up Contemporary Music Players.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

Here is a link to Aki Onda’s Bandcamp page where you can listen to and purchase his music.

Here is Aki’s informative personal website, which includes the map and notes for Silence Prevails.

Bonus Tracks from the Archives

Bonus Tracks from the Archives

April 25, 2021

Episode 39

 

Bonus Tracks from the Archives

 

Playlist

  1. Steve Birchall, “Summer Memories” from Reality Gates (1973 Poseidon Electronic Music Studio). Self-produced and distributed. EMS VCS-3, Eventide Clockworks Instant Phaser, EMT Reverb, Cooper Time Cube delay, Steve Birchall. 10:37. Not used in episode 38, Before “New Age” Music.
  2. Paul Bley, “Improvisie” from Improvisie, 1971. ARP 2500 synthesizer and RMI electric piano, Paul Bley; Voice, Piano, Electric Piano, Annette Peacock; Percussion, Han Bennink. 13:52. Not used in episode 15, Electronic Jazz, Part 3: Early Synthesizer Jazz.
  3. John Cage, David Tudor, “Duet For Cymbal” from John Cage, David Tudor, Christian Wolff ‎– San Francisco Museum Of Art, January 16th, 1965. Historic concert of live electronic music recorded by KPFA Radio.at San Francisco Museum of Art. "Duet for cymbal" was performed on a single cymbal with contact microphones agitated by a wide gamut of objects. 9:34. Not used in episode 12, David Tudor: From piano to electronics.
  4. Walter De Maria, “Ocean Music,” 1968, privately released. 20:30. Not used in episode 13, Electronic Jazz, Part 1: Before the Synthesizer.
  5. Toshiro Mayuzumi, “Mandara” for electronic sounds and voices (1969, Philips). 10:21. Not used in episode 16, Vintage Electronic Music from Japan, Part 1.
  6. Jacqueline Nova, “Creación De La Tierra” from Bertola / Nova / Orellana–Tres Composiciones Electroacusticas (1976 Tacuabé). Tape composition, Jacqueline Nova. Creación de la tierra (composed 1972) realized in the Studio of fonologia de la Universidad nacionál de Buenos Aires. 18:22. Not used in episode 5, Seeing and Touching Sound—Music for Magnetic Tape.
  7. Eliane Radigue, “Triptych 1” from Triptych (1978 Important RE). ARP 2500 Synthesizer, Eliane Radigue. Recorded in the composer's studio in Paris. Commissioned by Douglas Dunn for choreography. Only this part of Triptych was staged at the premiere at the Dancehall/Theatre of Nancy on February 27, 1978. 17:33. Not used in episode 5, Seeing and Touching Sound—Music for Magnetic Tape.
  8. Miki Yui, “Whisper” from the album Small Sounds (1999 BMB). Electronics, Miki Yui. “Small sounds are to merge and fuse with your acoustic environment - please play in a transparent level; in different atmosphere.” Composed and recorded in Cologne, Germany. 3:12. Not used in episode 5, Seeing and Touching Sound—Music for Magnetic Tape.
  9. Madelyn Byrne, “Winter” from Lesbian American Composers (CRI 1998). Electro-acoustic composition by Madelyn Byrne. 7:37. Not used in episode 5, Seeing and Touching Sound—Music for Magnetic Tape.
  10. Barney Wilen, “Auto Jazz: The Tragic Destiny of Lorenzo Bandini,” part 1, 1968. 5:37. Not used in episode 13, Electronic Jazz, Part 1: Before the Synthesizer. Bass, Beb Guérin; Drums,Eddy Gaumont; Piano, François Tusques; Saxophone, Barney Wilen. Soundtrack of race cars recorded at the Grand Prix de Monaco, May 7, 1967 by Barney Wilen.

Opening music: Ian Boddy, “Vox Lumina” from Aurora (2002 DiN). Composed, produced, played by Ian Boddy using: Software Instruments (Logic, Metasynth, Pluggo, Absynth, Reaktor, EVP88), Analogue synthesizers (VCS3, Roland 100M, Doepfer A100, Analogue Solutions, Analogue Systems), Sounds (Radio), Digital synthesizers (Roland JD990, Roland D550, Roland JP8000), Akai S6000 Digital Sampler.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

 

Before “New Age” Music

Before “New Age” Music

April 18, 2021

Episode 38

Before “New Age” Music

Playlist

  1. Irv Teibel, "Tintinnabulation (Contemplative Sound)" (excerpt) from Environments (New Concepts In Stereo Sound) (Disc 2) (1970 Syntonic Research).  This one side of the record is a rare work of purely electronic music in this series of ambient sounds. It uses computer-generated bell sounds, falling back on Teibel’s experience processing sounds on an IBM 360 mainframe computer at Bell Labs. Electronically generated gongs are the key sound and the record was promoted for meditation. A sticker on the cover said "A Sensitizer for the Mind." We will listen to the first ten minutes of this track 30-minute track from the album. From the liner notes: “As an illustration of the possibilities currently under examination, Syntonic Research decided to experiment with bell sounds as an environmental sound source. . . . Tintinnabulation can be played at any speed, from 78 to 16 rpm, in full stereo. At different speeds, the sounds change in tone and apparent size, although the harmonics remain unchanged. The effect, unlike real bells, is fully controllable by the use of your volume, bass, and treble controls.” 10:11
  2. Eberhard Schoener, “Meditation Part 2” from Meditation (1973 Ariola). Synthesizer and electronics, Eberhard Schoener. From the liner notes: “The voices are vocal transmissions. The material consists of white sound, sine, triangle, pulse and saw-tooth waves. No "live" or concrete sounds were used in the music.” This album is more in tune with the Environments approach, harmonies without musical structure. 18:19
  3. Master Wilburn Burchette, “Yin” from Psychic Meditation Music (1974 Burchette Brothers). Impro-guitar, analog synthesizers and electronics, Wilburn Burchette. Californian spiritual, Burchette self-produced and distributed his records on the Burchette Brothers label in collaboration with his brother, Kenneth, from 1971 to 1977. He gave up music in the late 70s to self-publish his prophecies by newsletter. In Burchette’s liner notes, he claimed to have discovered a new type of music called Impro. “Impro’s transcendental tone scale takes you into the frontiers of human experience.” 18:06
  4. Bill Reddie, “Starbody Suite” from Starbody (1974 Channel 1 Records). Produced and all instruments played by Bill Reddie. 20:08
  5. Iasos, " Maha-Splendor" from Inter-Dimensional Music (1975 Unity Records). First album by this Greek master of the electric flute. Composed and played by Iasos, all instruments including synthesizers. Electronics consultant, Rich Hensolt. From the liner notes: “The music of one who, with his inner eye, envisions the vast magnificence of Creation and becomes so overwhelmed by its infinite splendor that he goes into a state of spiritual ecstacy.” 5:51
  6. Steven Halpern, "Dancing Through The Rainbow Part 2" from Spectrum Suite (1976/79 Halpern Sounds). Composed, Produced, Fender Rhodes, Prophet 5 and Vako Orchestron synthesizers, Steven Halpern; electric flute, Iasos. The Vako Orchestron played pre-recorded sounds stored on an optical disc, primarily orchestral sounds as an alternative to the Mellotron. First of what would be thought of as a new age album from Halpern. There are many versions of this recording on cassette and LP. Originally released in 1975, this edition of the LP included for the first time the tracks "Dancing Through the Rainbow," parts 1 and 2. From the liner notes: “On this recording, his first in an entire series of Anti-Frantic Alternatives, Steven Halpern not only performs on his exquisite keyboard, but he plays YOUR human instrument as well.” 4:46
  7. Robert Bearns & Ron Dexter, "Flowers of Our Childhood" from The Golden Voyage Vol. One (1977 Awakening Productions). Produced and played by (all instruments) Robert Bearns and Ron Dexter. The first is a series of six albums around the theme of The Golden Voyage, initially released on cassette. 5:04
  8. Kitaro, "Mu/Dawn of the Astral" from Ten Kai/Astral Trip (1978 Polydor). Moog Synthesizer, Korg Synthesizer, ARP Synthesizer, Roland Synthesizer, Koto, Mandolin, Acoustic Guitar, Drums, Percussion, Bass, Kitaro. First album by Kitaro, recorded in Japan. Album renamed Astral Voyage and reissued in 1985. From the liner notes: “This sound is not created by me, but is felt in my soul.” (Kitaro). 8:11
  9. Kitaro, "Oasis" from Oasis/喜多郎(1979 Canyon). Korg, Roland, and Yamaha synthesizers, Acoustic Guitar, Percussion, Kitaro. 6:21
  10. Bernard Xolotl with Daniel Kobialka, "Adieu" from Procession (1983 Nada Pulse). Composed, all instruments including synthesizers, vocoder, and guitar synthesizer, Bernard Xolotl; Violin, Viola, Daniel Kobialka. Self-produced and release album, originally on cassette in 1981. 8:18

Introductory montage includes snippets of Bearns and Dexter, Iasos, Bill Reddie (inclouding narration by Eugene Albright from “A Uni-chotometric Meditation (Narration With Music)” from Starbody (1974 Channel 1 Records), narration by Dr. John P. Sykes and the album Sleep-Relaxation (1972 Folkways). "Learning the art of proper relaxation is the best therapy for the human body."

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Youseff Yancy–Pioneer of Electronic Jazz,  Part 2

Youseff Yancy–Pioneer of Electronic Jazz, Part 2

April 11, 2021

Episode 37

Youseff Yancy--Pioneer of Electronic Jazz, Part 2

 

Playlist

  1. Youseff Yancy and Genie Walker, "That Look" (circa 1979 from a privately recorded cassette tape). This recording is from a cassette and was digitally restored by Genie Walker.  Composer, vocals, Genie (Sherman) Walker; flugelhorn, electronics, Youseff Yancy. Recorded circa 1979. 3:41.
  2. Byard Lancaster, “Sweetness” from Documentation The End of a Decade (1980 Bellows). Theremin, Youseff Yancy; flute, Bayard Lancaster; vocal, Joan Hanson. This recording for solo voice and Theremin was later sampled in entirety for a rendition called “Heavenly Sweetness” by Better Daze, complete with electronic accompaniment (1995 Ubiquity). 4:25.
  3. Garrett List / A-1 Band, “Sweetness” from ‎Fire & Ice (1982 Lovely Music). Alto Saxophone, Byard Lancaster; Theremin, Electronics, Youseff Yancy; Vocals, Genie Sherman. 4:11.
  4. Garrett List / A-1 Band, “Fly Hollywood” from ‎Fire & Ice (1982 Lovely Music). Alto Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone, Flute, Piccolo Flute, Byard Lancaster; Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Theremin, Electronics, Youseff Yancy; Drums, Percussion, Ronald Shannon Jackson; Trombone, Piano, Vocals, Garrett List; Vocals, Genie Sherman. 4:12.
  5. Calvin Owens and His Blues Orchestra, “Vincent Van Gogh” from That’s Your Booty (1996 Sawdust Alley). Trumpet solo and vocals, Calvin Owens; Theremin, Youseff Yancy; Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Eddy De Vos, Kurt van Herck, Peter Vandendriessche; Backing Vocals, B. J. Scott, Frank Deruytter, Mieke Belange, Yan De Bryun; Baritone Saxophone, Bo Vander Werf, Johan Vandendriessche; Bass, Ban Buls, Roman Korohek; Cello, B. Piatkowski, X. Gao; Drums, Cesar Janssens, Laurent Mercier; Guitar, Marty Townsend, Yan De Bryun; Keyboards, Rafael Van Goubergen; Organ, Peter Van Bogart; Saxophone, Jimmy Heath; Tenor Saxophone, David "Fathead" Newman, Shelly Caroll Paul; Trombone, Marc Godfroid, Yan De Breker; Trumpet, Andy Haderer, Rüdiger Baldauf; Violin, D. Ivanov, E. Kouyoumdjian; Vocals, Archie Bell, Otis Clay, Ruby Wilson. 6:23.
  6. Hooverphonic, “‎L'Odeur Animale” from The Magnificent Tree (2000 Columbia). Guitar, Raymond Geerts; Keyboards, Bass, Programmed by Alex Callier; Vocals, Geike Arnaert; Theremin, trumpet, Youseff Yancy; Fairlight, Effects, Dan Lacksman. 3:48.
  7. Hooverphonic, “‎Jackie Cane” from The Magnificent Tree (2000 Columbia). Guitar, Raymond Geerts; Keyboards, Bass, Programmed by Alex Callier; Vocals, Geike Arnaert; Theremin, Youseff Yancy; Fairlight, Effects, Dan Lacksman. 4:21.
  8. James Baldwin, David Linx, Pierre Van Dormael , “A Lover’s Questions Part II” from A Lover's Question (1999 Label Bleu). Poetry written and read by James Baldwin; produced by David Linx, Pierre Van Dormael; Trumpet, Theremin, Youseff Yancy; Harmonica, Toots Thielmans; backing vocals, Téjan Karefa-Smart; Percussion, Chris Joris; Saxophone, Flute, Percussion, Voice, Byard Lancaster; Vocals, Deborah Brown; Vocals, Drums, Percussion, David Linx. Poetry of James Baldwin set to jazz, features Yancy on two tracks. 6:47.

Opening background music: Garrett List / A-1 Band, “Passions of Miles” from ‎Fire & Ice (1982 Lovely Music). Composed by, Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Theremin, Electronics, Youseff Yancy; Alto Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone, Flute, Piccolo Flute, Byard Lancaster; Drums, Percussion, Ronald Shannon Jackson; Trombone, Piano, Vocals, Garrett List; Vocals, Genie Sherman. 5:54.

Second background track: Byard Lancaster, “Blue Nature” from, Documentation The End of a Decade (1980 Bellows). Theremin and trumpet, Youseff Yancy. Recorded in New York in 1979, this is a multi-tracked, solo performance by Yancy on his own composition. One track of straight trumpet, at least one track of electronically modified trumpet, and another track of Theremin. On the liner notes, “B. Lancaster acknowledges the spiritual and education guidance from Youseff Yancy and family.” 2:43.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

 

Listening to Malcolm Cecil and T.O.N.T.O.

Listening to Malcolm Cecil and T.O.N.T.O.

April 4, 2021

Episode 36

Listening to Malcolm Cecil and T.O.N.T.O

Malcolm Cecil’s synthesizer setup was known as T.O.N.T.O., an acronym meaning The Original New Timbral Orchestra.

Playlist

  1. Caldera, “Share With Me the Pain” from A Moog Mass (1970 Kama Sutra). Synthesizer programming and engineering by Malcolm Cecil and Robert Margouleff; spoken vocals, Malcolm Cecil; tenor vocals, Robert White; harpsichord, John Atkins; synthetic speech effects, Robert Margouleff’ cello, toby Saks. 4:31
  2. Tonto's Expanding Head Band, “Timewhys” from Zero Time (1971 Atlantic). Written by, programmed, engineered, produced and performed by Malcolm Cecil and Robert Margoulff. Lyrics by Tama Starr. Recorded with an expanded Moog Modular III synthesizer. This was prior to expanding their system into what would become T.O.N.T.O.. 5:03
  3. Tonto's Expanding Head Band, “Cybernaut” from Zero Time (1971 Atlantic). Written, programmed, engineered, produced and performed by Malcolm Cecil and Robert Margoulff. Recorded with an expanded Moog Modular III synthesizer. A nice demonstration of what they could accomplish with the Moog. 4:31
  4. Stephen Stills/Manassas, “Move Around” from Manassas (1972 Atlantic). Synthesizer, electric guitar, organ, vocals, producer, Stephen Stills; keyboards, Paul Harris; drums, Dallas Taylor; guitar, Chris Hillman. Synthesizer programming, Malcolm Cecil. 4:17
  5. Stevie Wonder, “Keep on Running” from Music Of My Mind (1972 Tamla). Synthesizers, ARP and Moog, Piano, Drums, Harmonica, Organ, Clavichord, Clavinet, Stevie Wonder. Engineering and synthesizer programming, Malcolm Cecil and Robert Margouleff. Adds the ARP and another Moog to the T.O.N.T.O. setup. 6:38
  6. Stevie Wonder, “Evil” from Music Of My Mind (1972 Tamla). Synthesizers, ARP and Moog, Piano, Drums, Harmonica, Organ, Clavichord, Clavinet, Stevie Wonder. Engineering and synthesizer programming, Malcolm Cecil and Robert Margouleff. 3:31
  7. Pat Rebillot, “The Naked Truth” from Free Fall (1974 Atlantic). Synthesizer and electric piano, Pat Rebillot. Engineering and synthesizer programming, Malcolm Cecil and Robert Margouleff. 3:28
  8. Tonto, “The Boatman” from It's About Time (1974 Polydor). Written, programmed, engineered, produced, and performed by Malcolm Cecil and Robert Margoulff. Features the expanded analog version of T.O.N.T.O. featuring ARP, Moog, and Oberheim equipment. Note the rain and thunder sounds created using the synthesizer. Reminds me of Beaver and Krause from this era. 5:04.
  9. Tonto, “Tonto’s Travels” from It's About Time (1974 Polydor). Written, programmed, engineered, produced, and performed by Malcolm Cecil and Robert Margoulff. Features the expanded analog version of T.O.N.T.O. featuring ARP, Moog, and Oberheim equipment. I think you can hear the joystick that Cecil created. 8:25
  10. Mandrill, “Peaceful Atmosphere” from Beast From The East (1975 United Artists Records). T.O.N.T.O. played by Claude “Coffee” Cave, Carlos Wilson; electronic music programming, Malcolm Cecil. From the liner notes: “T.O.N.T.O. The Original New-Timbrel Orchestra. This instrument consists of twelve synthesizers linked together and played simultaneously. A polyphonic touch-sensitive also plays also plays an essential role in the creation of sound when the instrument is played. We thank you Malcolm Cecil for the creation of T.O.N.T.O. 3:19
  11. Mandrill, “Honey-Butt” from Beast From The East (1975 United Artists Records). T.O.N.T.O. played by Claude “Coffee” Cave, Carlos Wilson; electronic music programming, Malcolm Cecil. 4:58
  12. Stairsteps, “Theme Of Angels” from 2nd Resurrection (1976 Dark Horse Records). Synthesizer, T.O.N.T.O., Billy Preston; T.O.N.T.O. programmed by Malcolm Cecil and Robert Margouleff; produced and engineered by Robert Margouleff. Music By, Lyrics By, Lead Vocals, Lead Guitar, Bass, Kenneth Burke; Backing Vocals, Ivory Davis; Backing Vocals, Stairsteps; Drums, Alvin Taylor; Guitar, Dennis Burke; Keyboards, Billy Preston. 3:18
  13. Stairsteps, “Salaam” from 2nd Resurrection (1976 Dark Horse Records). Synthesizer, T.O.N.T.O., Billy Preston; T.O.N.T.O. programmed by Malcolm Cecil and Robert Margouleff; produced and engineered by Robert Margouleff. Music By, Lyrics By, Lead Vocals, Lead Guitar, Bass, Kenneth Burke; Backing Vocals, Ivory Davis; Backing Vocals, Stairsteps; Drums, Alvin Taylor; Guitar, Dennis Burke; Keyboards, Billy Preston. 4:26
  14. Quincy Jones, “I Heard That” from I Heard That!! (1976 A&M). Synthesizer, Dave Gruisin. Synthesizer programming by Malcom Cecil, Robert Margouleff, Paul Beaver. 2:12
  15. Quincy Jones, “Theme from ‘The Anderson Tapes” from I Heard That!! (1976 A&M). Synthesizer, Dave Gruisin. Synthesizer programming by Malcom Cecil, Robert Margouleff, Paul Beaver. Synthesizer, Ed Kalehoff. Also features a vibraphone solo by Milt Jackson, a trumpet solo by Freddie Hubbard, Toots Thielemans on harmonica, and Bobby Scott on piano. 5:05
  16. Steve Hillage, “Octave Doctors” from Motivation Radio (1977 Virgin). Producer, Engineer, Synthesizer T.O.N.T.O., Malcolm Cecil; Synthesizer & Saucersizer, Vocals, Lyrics, Miquette Giraudy; Composed, Arranged, Lyrics, Guitar, Guitar Synthesizer, Voice, Shenai; Steve Hillage. 3:30
  17. Steve Hillage, “Radio” from Motivation Radio (1977 Virgin). Producer, Engineer, Synthesizer T.O.N.T.O., Malcolm Cecil; Synthesizer, Vocals, Lyrics, Miquette Giraudy; Composed, Arranged, Lyrics, Guitar, Guitar Synthesizer, Voice, Shenai; Steve Hillage. 6:11
  18. Gil Scott-Heron & Brian Jackson, “1980” from 1980 (1980 Arista). Produced by Brian Jackson, Gil Scott-Heron, Malcolm Cecil; engineered and mixed by Malcolm Cecil; Synthesizer (T.O.N.T.O.), piano, electric piano, keyboard bass, Brian Jackson; composer, guitar, piano, vocals, Gil Scott-Heron; horns, Bill Watrous, Denis Sirias, Gordon Goodwin; drums, Harvey Mason; guitar, Marlo Henderson. 5:59
  19. Gil Scott-Heron & Brian Jackson, “Late Last Night” from 1980 (1980 Arista). Produced by Brian Jackson, Gil Scott-Heron, Malcolm Cecil; engineered and mixed by Malcolm Cecil; Synthesizer (T.O.N.T.O.), piano, electric piano, keyboard bass, Brian Jackson; composer, guitar, piano, vocals, Gil Scott-Heron; horns, Bill Watrous, Denis Sirias, Gordon Goodwin; drums, Harvey Mason; guitar, Marlo Henderson. 4:24
  20. Malcolm Cecil, “Gamelonia Dawn” from Radiance (1981 Unity Records). Composed, Performed, Produced, Engineered by Malcolm Cecil. Recorded at T.O.N.T.O. studios in Santa Monica, California. From the liner notes: “The Original New Timbral Orchestra is the world’s largest privately built and owned synthesizer standing some six feet high and twenty feet in diameter. It was designed and built by Malcom Cecil.” In addition to Cecil on T.O.N.T.O., this track features Paul Horn on “golden” flute. 4:35
  21. Malcolm Cecil, “Dance of the Heart” from Radiance (1981 Unity Records). Composed, Performed, Produced, Engineered by Malcolm Cecil. Recorded at T.O.N.T.O. studios in Santa Monica, California. 3:28

 

Background music:

  • Caldera, “Make Me Carry The Death Of Christ” from A Moog Mass (1970 Kama Sutra). Synthesizer programming and engineering by Malcolm Cecil and Robert Margouleff; spoken vocals, Malcolm Cecil; tenor vocals, Robert White; harpsichord, John Atkins; synthetic speech effects, Robert Margouleff’ cello, toby Saks.
  • Tonto's Expanding Head Band, “Riversong” from Zero Time (1971 Atlantic). Written by, programmed, engineered, produced and performed by Malcolm Cecil and Robert Margoulff. Lyrics by Tama Starr. Recorded with an expanded Moog Modular III synthesizer. This was prior to expanding their system into what would become T.O.N.T.O.. 8:01

Here is the video produced with Malcolm Cecil by the National Music Centre of Canada.

This short history of T.O.N.T.O. at Rolling Stone magazine is also of interest.

 

Introductory and background music by Thom Holmes unless otherwise indicated.

Opening and closing sequences were voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

For episode notes, see Noise and Notations.

For more information about the history of electronic music, see Electronic and Experimental Music, sixth edition, published by Routledge.

Sonic Suitcase Edition—Springtime Apparition

Sonic Suitcase Edition—Springtime Apparition

March 27, 2021

Episode 35

Sonic Suitcase Edition—Springtime Apparition

 

Playlist

Springtime Apparition (2021 Holmes) is an original electronic composition that comprises a remixed portion of the recording:

  • Leopold Stokowski Conducting Members of The NBC Symphony, 'Pastoral' Symphony and Sounds of Nature (1954 RCA Victor Red Seal, mono). This is Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6, In F, Op. 68 ("Pastoral").

Another recording used for about two minutes of the work is:

  • Peter Paul Kellogg, Arthur A. Allen, Voices Of The Night­–The Calls Of 34 Frogs And Toads Of The United States And Canada (1953 Cornell University Records).

 

Other electronic sounds and field recordings by Thom Holmes.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

 

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