The Holmes Archive of Electronic Music
The Hammond Novachord—An Early Synthesizer

The Hammond Novachord—An Early Synthesizer

January 18, 2021

Episode 25

The Hammond Novachord—An Early Synthesizer

 

Playlist

  1. Milt Herth, “Basin Street Blues” from Basin Street Blues / Twelfth Street Rag (1937 Decca). Organ solo played on the Hammond Electric Organ. An example of the electro-mechanical organ sound, for comparison to the other tracks recorded using the Novachord.
  2. Public Domain. “Intermission Music,” Gone With The Wind (Music From The Original Motion Picture Soundtrack As Monophonically Recorded In 1939), Max Steiner. This comprises two short works, one for the beginning of intermission (when the lights went up and everyone headed for the concession stand and bathrooms) and one for the end of intermission (when the lights went down). The music was recorded in 1939 for the movie theater.
  3. Vera Lynn (vocal), “Wish Me Luck (As You Wave Me Goodbye)” from A Mother's Prayer At Twilight / Wish Me Luck (As You Wave Me Goodbye) (1939 Decca). UK recording with Arthur Young on the Novachord. A dexterous recording by Young who explored the rhythmic textures that were possible on the instrument.
  4. Collins H. Driggs, “In a Persian Market” from Cascades Of Melody (1941 Victor). Novachord solo.
  5. Collins H. Driggs, “The Blue Room” from Cascades Of Melody (1941 Victor). Novachord solo.
  6. Collins H. Driggs, “Song of the Islands” from The Magic of the Novachord (1941 Victor). Novachord solo.
  7. Fred Feibel, “Rose Room,” from Novachord Solos (circa 1941 Columbia). Novachord solo.
  8. Herb Kern and Lloyd Sloop, “Dancing Tambourine” from Treasure Chests of Transcriptions for the Home (1949 Tempo). Hammond Electric Organ, Herb Kern; Hammond Novachord, Lloyd Sloop.
  9. Herb Kern and Lloyd Sloop, “Twelfth Street Rag” from Treasure Chests of Transcriptions for the Home (1949 Tempo). Hammond Electric Organ, Herb Kern; Hammond Novachord, Lloyd Sloop.
  10. Jerry Goldsmith, “It's Gotta Be A World's Record” from Our Man Flint (Original Motion Picture Score) (1966 20thCentury Fox). Novachord being put through at least four types of voicings as the tune progresses. The sounds are distinctly presented as solos.
  11. Jerry Goldsmith, “Lost in Space” from In Like Flint (Original Motion Picture Score) (1967 20th Century Fox). The Novachord is heard for a short sequence about 16 seconds into this track and then again beginning at about 1:16 where is consists of a rhythmic bed for the rest of the track. A theremin is heard in the closing seconds.
  12. Christopher Komeda, “The Coven” from Rosemary's Baby (Music From The Motion Picture Score) (1968 Dot). Paul Beaver played the Novachord on many tracks, mostly for effects. In this case, the Novachord plays a persistent drone rhythm throughout the track with other instruments played on top of the mix. It is sometimes hard to tell the effects that can be attributed to the Novachord once we get to this era of multitrack recording and studio effects.
  13. The Mystic Moods Orchestra, “Sunny Goodge Street” from Emotions (1968 Philips). Paul Beaver’s Novachord (calliope sound) played by Lincoln Mayorga. You may also hear a harpsichord, Clavinet, piano, and celeste.
  14. Phil Cirocco, “Music of the Electron” from ‎The Novachord Restoration Project: Music Of The Electron (2007 C.M.S.). Phil Cirocco at a restored Novachord.
  15. Phil Cirocco, “The Inner Sanctum” from ‎The Novachord Restoration Project: Music Of The Electron (2007 C.M.S.). Phil Cirocco at a restored Novachord.
  16. Phil Cirocco, “Spark” from ‎The Novachord Restoration Project: Music Of The Electron (2007 C.M.S.). Phil Cirocco at a restored Novachord.
  17. Phil Cirocco, “The Floating” from ‎The Novachord Restoration Project: Music Of The Electron (2007 C.M.S.). Phil Cirocco at a restored Novachord.
  18. Steve Howell and Dan Wilson, “NovaBerlin” from the UK Novachord Restoration Project (2010 Hollow Sun). Sample Novachord sounds using modern studio techniques. Although the Novachord did not have sequencing capability, the sounds can effectively be looped and repeated to create such sequences.
  19. Steve Howell and Dan Wilson, “Strings Galore” from the UK Novachord Restoration Project (2010 Hollow Sun). Sample Novachord sounds using modern studio techniques. Demonstrates the string ensemble potential of the Novachord.
  20. Steve Howell and Dan Wilson, “Montage” from the UK Novachord Restoration Project (2010 Hollow Sun). Sample Novachord sounds using modern studio techniques. Demonstrates a variety of musical styles using the Novachord.
  21. Basia Bulat , “Time” from Good Advice (2015 Secret City). Vocals, Hammond Novachord, RMI Electra Piano, Piano, Synthesizer, Marxophone, Mellotron, Basia Bulat; bass guitar, electric guitar, Jim James; cello, Charlie Patton; drums, Dave Givan; violin, Scott Moore.

 

The Archive Mix

Two tracks played at the same time to see what happens.

  • Herb Kern, Lloyd Sloop, Warren Arey, “Silent Night” (1949 Tempo). chimes, vibraphone, vibraharp, Warren Arey; Hammond Electric Organ, Herb Kern; Hammond Novachord, Lloyd Sloop.
  • Milt Herth, “Twelfth Street Rag” from Basin Street Blues / Twelfth Street Rag (1937 Decca).

 

 

Links:

The Sonic Suitcase Edition–Harbors

The Sonic Suitcase Edition–Harbors

January 10, 2021

Episode 24

The Sonic Suitcase Edition—Harbors

 

Playlist

  1. Thom Holmes, contact microphone on an expresso machine (2021 Connecticut).
  2. Cook Laboratories, “Coffee Percolating” and “Pouring,” from Cook Sound Effects Vol 2 (1961 Cook).
  3. Cook Laboratories, “Power Sawing.” From Cook Sound Effects Vol 2 (1961 Cook).
  4. Cook Laboratories, “Water Dripping.” From Cook Sound Effects Vol 2 (1961 Cook).
  5. Argo Transacord, “Evening in Harbour,” from Sounds of the Sea and Ships (1965, Argo).
  6. Leo Hurwitz, Charles Pratt, “ Ocean Into Inland Waters” from Here At The Waters' Edge 1 (1962 Folkways).
  7. Audio Fidelity, “Sawmill Scene” from Sound Effects Volume 14 (1972 Audio Fidelity).
  8. Major Records, “Chopping Tree” from Major Records 5045B (1950).
  9. Audio Fidelity, “Hammering Nail and Electric Saw” from Sound Effects Volume 1 (1960 Audio Fidelity).
  10. Cook Laboratories, “Water going down noisy drain” from Cook Sound Effects Vol 2 (1961 Cook).
  11. BBC, “Heavy Seawash” from Sound Effects No. 1 (1969 BBC).
  12. BBC, “Seagulls” from Sound Effects No. 1 (1969 BBC).
  13. Thom Holmes, contact microphone on an espresso machine frother (2021 Connecticut).
  14. BBC, “Diving, 1 splash” from Sound Effects No. 1 (1969 BBC).
  15. BBC, “Diving, double splash” from Sound Effects No. 1 (1969 BBC).
  16. BBC, “Threshing water” from Sound Effects No. 1 (1969 BBC).
  17. Mcintosh, “Alarm Clocks“ from Thru The Sound Barrier With McIntosh (1955 McIntosh Music).
  18. Audio Fidelity, “National Cash Register Electronic Adding Machine” from Sound Effects Volume 1 (1960 Audio Fidelity).
  19. Philip S. Gross, random morse codes without vocal instruction (1962 Folkways).
  20. Philip S. Gross, vocal instruction without morse code (1962 Folkways).
  21. Audio Fidelity, “IBM Electric Typewriter” from Sound Effects Volume 1 (1960 Audio Fidelity).
  22. Audio Fidelity, “Royal Typewriter” from Sound Effects Volume 1 (1960 Audio Fidelity).
  23. Cook Laboratories, “Power lawnmower.” From Cook Sound Effects Vol 2 (1961 Cook).
  24. BBC, “Fireworks - General Display” from Sound Effects No. 1 (1969 BBC).
  25. Speedy Sound Effects, “News Effects No. 11: Receiving from a Teletype Machine” from Sound Effects No. G-14 (1950 Speedy).
  26. Audio Fidelity, “Railroad Telegraph” from Sound Effects Volume 1 (1960 Audio Fidelity).
  27. Major Records, “Space Computer” from Sound Effects Volume 21 (1978 Major).
  28. Audio Fidelity, “Serenity: The Silent Surf” from Ambience One (An Adventure In Environmental Sound) (1970 Audio Fidelity).
  29. Thom Holmes, rain and thunder (2017 Connecticut).
  30. Thom Holmes, chicken coop (2017 Upstate New York).
  31. Audio Fidelity, “Fire Island Ferry” from Sound Effects Volume 14 (1972 Audio Fidelity).
  32. Mel Kaiser, “Medium Freq. Sweeps (With Echo Re-Verb & Pulses, Drones)” from Science Fiction Sound Effects Record (1958 Folkways).
  33. Mel Kaiser, “Low Freq. Sweeps” from Science Fiction Sound Effects Record (1958 Folkways).
  34. Mel Kaiser, “Frequency Sweep - Dual” from Science Fiction Sound Effects Record (1958 Folkways).
  35. Thom Holmes, bonfire (2017 Upstate New York).
  36. Brad Miller, “The Sounds of the Storm” from Nature's Mystic Moods - The Sounds Of The Storm And The Sea (1974 Bainbridge).
  37. Thom Holmes, rain drone study (2016 Connecticut).
  38. Audio Fidelity, “Sunday Cycling, Central Park” from Sound Effects Volume 14 (1972 Audio Fidelity).
  39. Thom Holmes, “Study for Interference (opening)” (2017, Connecticut).
  40. Thom Holmes, electronic crickets and birds (2016-17 Connecticut).
  41. Mcintosh, “Machinery Sounds“ from Thru The Sound Barrier With McIntosh (1955 McIntosh Music).
  42. Cook Laboratories, “Festival” (excerpt) from Mexican Firecrackers (1956 Cook).

 

Music for Space Travelers

Music for Space Travelers

January 5, 2021

Episode 23

Music for Space Travelers

Lingering Sounds from the Atomic Age

 

Playlist

  1. Hamilton O'Hara And Charlie Dobson Featuring Satellite Singers and Orchestra, Directed by, written by Jim Timmens, “With A Great Big Noise Like Thunder (Rocket Into Space),” from Journey to the Moon and More about Outer Space (1974, Golden Records). Excerpt.
  2. Eric Siday, “Challenge of Space” from “The Ultra Sonic Perception” (1961 Conroy). Magnetic tape music and effects by Eric Siday for this album of library music for broadcast.
  3. The Tornadoes, “Telstar” from The Sounds Of The Tornadoes (1962 London), written and produced by Joe Meek. The record was named after the Telstar communications satellite which was launched into orbit on July 10, 1962. It featured the Clavioline.
  4. Toru Hatano, “Solaris” from Space Adventure (1978 Mu Land). Musical Instruments: KORG Polyphonic Ensemble 1000, KORG Polyphonic Ensemble "Orchestra" 2000, KORG Synthesizer 800DV, KORG Synthesizer 770, Rhythm Machine-mini pops 120P, Drums, Electric Guitar, Strings Ensemble.
  5. Tom Dissevelt, “Moon Maid” from Song of the Second Moon (1968 Limelight). This was a North American reissue of a track from 1962 called “Drifting” recorded in the Netherlands at the Philips electronic music laboratory.
  6. Dick Raaijmakers, “The Ray Makers” from Song of the Second Moon (1968 Limelight). This was a North American reissue of a track from 1962 called “Mechanical Motions” recorded in the Netherlands at the Philips electronic music laboratory. The US song title is a play on the last name of the composer, which is pronounced “Ray-makers.”
  7. Hugues Dufourt, Ensemble D'Instruments Électroniques De L'Itinéraire, Peter Eötvös, “Saturne, Part C (1978),” from Saturne (1980 Sappho). The work was conceived for an ensemble of wind instruments (12 performers), a group of percussion (6 performers) and an ensemble of electrical instruments (4 performers). Saturne was recorded in the Espace de Projection of the IRCAM centre Pompidou on 1st and 2nd December 1979. The first public performance of the work was made on the same place on the 3rd December 1979. Composed by Hugues Dufourt. Ensemble D'Instruments Électroniques De L'Itinéraire, electric guitar and synthesizer, Claude Pavy, François Bousch.
  8. Peter Huse, “Space Play (1969)” from Carrefour (Musique, Électro-Acoustique/Electroacoustic Music, Canada) (1972, Radio Canada International). Made in the Sonic Research Studio at Simon Fraser University. Huse was assistant director of the World Soundscape Project around this time. About this work he said, “Science fiction cinema taught me to regard all sounds and physical space as materials for music.” This play of sound in space was created using magnetic tape composition.
  9. Eric Siday, “Galaxy” from “The Ultra Sonic Perception” (1961 Conroy). Magnetic tape music and effects by Eric Siday for this album of library music for broadcast.
  10. John Keating, “Earthshine” from Space Experience 2 (1975 EMI). Produced by John Keating. Keyboards by Francis Monkman. All electronic instruments by ARP including 2600, Odysseynsemble, Pro Soloist, String Ensemble.
  11. Claude Dubois, “Une Guitare Des Ondes Et Leur Machine” from Fable D'espace (1978 Pingouin). Music and lyrics, produced by Claude Dubois; Synthesizer, Jean-Yves Labat; Drums, John Wilcox; Guitar, Percussion, Synthesizer, Engineer, John Holbrook; Piano, Clavinet, Bass, Electric Piano Richard Bell.
  12. Spirit, “Space Child,” from Twelve Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus (1970 Epic). Composer, keyboards, Moog Synthesizer, John Locke; vocals, guitar, Randy California; vocals, percussion, Jay Ferguson; drums, percussion, Ed Cassidy; bass, vocals, Mark Andes; produced by David Briggs.
  13. Lothar and the Hand People, “Space Hymn” from “Space Hymn” (1969 Capitol). ''All electronic music on this album was created and realized by the Hand People on Moog Synthesizer and Lothar, the Theremin.'' Lothar and the Hand People: John Emelin, Kim King, Paul Conly, Rusty Ford, Tom Flye. Written by Tom Flye. Produced by Nickolas Venet.
  14. Sun Ra, “Cosmic Explorer (1970)” excerpt, from Nuits De La Fondation Maeght Volume 1 (1971 Shandar). “Intergalactic instruments played by Sun Ra.” Recorded live at Saint Paul de Vence, France, 3/5 August 1970. Compositions by Sun Ra. Minimoog solos by Sun Ra. Percussion by Nimrod Hunt, Lex Humphries, and John Goldsmith. I’ve included over eight minutes of this 20-minute piece.
  15. Isao Tomita, “The Sea Named ‘Solaris’ (Bach, Three-Part Invention No. 2 in C Minor-Chorale)," from Kosmos (1978 RCA). This is the complete version of the work that was shortened for use with the Cosmos television series and various greatest hits albums. " Music electronically created by Isao Tomita.
  16. Vangelis, “Pulstar” from Albedo 0.39 (1976 RCA). Keyboards, synthesizers, drums, bass, Vangelis. Speaking Clock: Post Office Telecommunications. The term “albedo” refers to the reflecting power of a planet or other non-luminous body.
  17. Isao Tomita, “The Earth - A Hollow Vessel” (Tomita: “Dororo”), from The Bermuda Triangle (1979 RCA). Music electronically created by Isao Tomita.
  18. Isao Tomita, “The Song Of Venus (Prokofiev: Violin Concerto No. 1, First Movement),” from The Bermuda Triangle (1979 RCA). Music electronically created by Isao Tomita.

Archive Mix (two tracks played at the same time).

  • Dick Raaijmakers, “Song of the Second Moon” from Song of the Second Moon (1968 Limelight). Recorded in the Netherlands at the Philips electronic music laboratory in 1962.
  • Sun Ra, “The Star Gazers” (1970)” from Nuits De La Fondation Maeght Volume 1 (1971 Shandar). “Intergalactic instruments played by Sun Ra.” Recorded live at Saint Paul de Vence, France, 3/5 August 1970. Compositions by Sun Ra. Synthesizer [Moog], piano, electric piano, organ [electric], Sun Ra; vocal by Verta Grosvenor.
Music from the Dark–In Memory of Harold Budd

Music from the Dark–In Memory of Harold Budd

December 29, 2020

Episode 22

Music from the Dark–In Memory of Harold Budd

Playlist

  1. Harold Budd, “Style Is,” an interview excerpt (with music) (cassette, 1983 Les Disques Du Crépuscule). Part of a longer production by Wim Mertens for the New Musical Festival in Chicago, July 1982, featuring music and interviews (by Mertens). The festival featured performances by Peter Gordon, Jon Gibson, Meredith Monk, Jill Kroesen, Glenn Branca and others. The recording was dedicated to John Cage, and intended to be released on his 70th birthday, 1982.
  2. Harold Budd, “Noyo” (1970 unreleased), excerpt. From a late-night electronic music mix produced by the editorial staff of Source Magazine--Music of the Avant Garde. Harold Budd, voice, Buchla Modular synthesizer, jazz ensemble (uncredited).
  3. Harold Budd, “The Oak of The Golden Dreams” (1971 Advance), for Buchla modular synthesizer from the California Institute of the Arts, based on the Balinese 'Slendro' scale, a five-note scale and the older of the two most common scales used in Indonesian gamelan music.
  4. Harold Budd, “The Plateaux Of Mirror” from Ambient 2 (The Plateaux Of Mirror) (1980 Editions EG). Composed by Harold Budd and Brian Eno; acoustic and electric piano, Harold Budd; other instruments and treatments, produced by Brian Eno.
  5. Harold Budd, “The Serpent (In Quicksilver)” from The Serpent (In Quicksilver) (1981 Cantil). Bass, Eugene Bowen; Electric Piano [Yamaha Electric Piano], Grand Piano [Bosendorfer], Organ [Hammond Organ] and producer, Harold Budd.
  6. Harold Budd, “On Performing,” an interview excerpt (with music) (cassette, 1983 Les Disques Du Crépuscule).
  7. Harold Budd, “A Stream with Bright Fish” from The Pearl (1984 Editions EG). Composed by Harold Budd and Brian Eno. Produced by Brian Eno and Daniel Lanois.
  8. Harold Budd, “Against the Sky” from The Pearl (1984 Editions EG). Composed by Harold Budd and Brian Eno. Produced by Brian Eno and Daniel Lanois.
  9. Harold Budd, “Abandoned Cities” excerpt from Abandoned Cities (1984 Cantil). Composed, performed and produced by Harold Budd. Guitar Eugene Bowen.
  10. Harold Budd, “Flowered Knife Shadows (For Simon Raymonde)” from Lovely Thunder (1986 Editions EG). Composed and performed by Harold Budd. Produced by Harold Budd and Michael Hoenig.
  11. Harold Budd, “The White Arcades” from The White Arcades (1988 Opal). Composed, performed and produced by Harold Budd
  12. Harold Budd, “Advent” from By The Dawn's Early Light (1991 Opal). Piano, Organ [Hammond B3], Synthesizer, Vocals, Artwork, Written-By [Poems], Composed By, Producer, Harold Budd; Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Bill Nelson; Harp, Susan Allen; Steel Guitar, BJ Cole; Viola, Mabel Wong.
  13. Harold Budd, “Paul McCarthy” from Luxa (1996 All Saints). Composer, performer, producer, Harold Budd.
  14. Harold Budd, “The Room of Ancillary Dreams” from The Room (2000 Atlantic). Composer, performer, producer, Harold Budd.
  15. Harold Budd, “Arabesque 3” from Avalon Sutra (2004 Samadhisound). Composer, performer, producer, Harold Budd. Composer and sopranino saxophone, Jon Gibson.
  16. Harold Budd, “It’s Steeper Near the Roses (for David Sylvian)” from Avalon Sutra (2004 Samadhisound). Composer, performer, producer, Harold Budd. Cello,Marston Smith; Viola, James Acevedo; Violins, James Sitterly and Peter Kent.
  17. Harold Budd, “Jane 1” from Jane 1-11 (2014 Darla). Composer, performer, producer, Harold Budd.
  18. Harold Budd, “As Long as I can Hold My Breath” from Avalon Sutra (2004 Samadhisound). Composer, performer, producer, Harold Budd.

 

Archive Mix (two tracks played at the same time).

  • Harold Budd, “Jane 11” from Jane 1-11 (2014 Darla). Composer, performer, producer, Harold Budd.
  • Harold Budd, “As Long as I can Hold My Breath” (excerpt of longer version) from Avalon Sutra (2004 Samadhisound). Composer, performer, producer, Harold Budd.

 

Merry Moog and other Synthesized Holiday Favorites

Merry Moog and other Synthesized Holiday Favorites

December 20, 2020

Episode 21

Merry Moog

And Other Synthesized Holiday Favorites

 

Playlist

  1. Jean Jacques Perrey and Sy Mann, “Christmas Bells” from Switched on Santa (1970 Pickwick). USA. Moog Modular Synthesizer.
  2. Moog Machine, “O Holy Night” from Christmas Becomes Electric (1970 Columbia). USA. Moog Modular Synthesizer.
  3. The Roots, “Millie Pulled A Pistol On Santa” from Just Say Noël (1996 Geffen). USA.
  4. Douglas Leedy, “The Coventry Carol” from A Very Merry Electric Christmas to You (1970 Capitol). USA. Moog Modular Synthesizer and Buchla Synthesizer.
  5. Jimmy Smith, “The Christmas Song” from Christmas Cookin’ (1964 Verve). USA. Hammond organ.
  6. Don Voegeli, “Chanukah” from Holiday & Seasonal Music (1977 EMI). USA. Produced at the Electrosonic Studio of the University of Wisconsin-Extension.
  7. Joseph Byrd, “Christmas in the Morning” from A Christmas Yet to Come (1975 Takoma). USA. ARP 2600 Synthesizer with an Oberheim Expander Module.
  8. Douglas Leedy, “Deck the Halls” from A Very Merry Electric Christmas to You (1970 Capitol). USA. Moog Modular Synthesizer and Buchla Synthesizer.
  9. Douglas Leedy, “Good King Wenceslas” from A Very Merry Electric Christmas to You (1970 Capitol). USA. Moog Modular Synthesizer and Buchla Synthesizer.
  10. Beck, “The Little Drum Machine Boy” from Just Say Noël (1996 Geffen). USA. Roland TR-808 Rhythm Composer.
  11. Armen Ra, “O Come All Ye Faithful” from Theremin Christmas (2018 Sungod). USA. Moog Etherwave Pro Theremin.
  12. Don Voegeli, “Carol of the Drum” from Holiday & Seasonal Music (1977 EMI). USA. Produced at the Electrosonic Studio of the University of Wisconsin-Extension.
  13. Rudolf Escher, “The Long Christmas Dinner”(1960) from Anthology Of Dutch Electronic Tape Music: Volume 1 (1955-1966) (1978 Composer’s Voice). Netherlands. Electronic tape composition.
  14. Jean Jacques Perrey and Sy Mann, “Jingle Bells” from Switched on Santa (1970 Pickwick). USA. Moog Modular Synthesizer.
  15. Taeko Onuki, Inori (Prayer) from We Wish You A Merry Christmas (1984 Yen). A compilation of specially recorded Christmas-themed songs from various artists on the Yen Records label. Japanese synth-pop with vocals by Onuki. Maybe Ryuichi Sakamoto on keyboards.
  16. Douglas Leedy, “God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen” from A Very Merry Electric Christmas to You (1970 Capitol). USA. Moog Modular Synthesizer and Buchla Synthesizer.
  17. Philippe Renaux, “Noël Blanc” (“White Christmas”) from We Wish You A Cosmic Christmas (1977 Sinus). Belgium. Minimoog, Arp Axe, Arp Soloist, EMS Synthesizer, Stringman Crumar, Fender Rhodes, Electronic Drums.
  18. Jean Jacques Perrey and Sy Mann, “Tijuana Christmas” from Switched on Santa (1970 Pickwick). USA. Moog Modular Synthesizer.
  19. Jean Jacques Perrey and Sy Mann, “My Favorite Things” from Switched on Santa (1970 Pickwick). USA. Moog Modular Synthesizer.
  20. Paul Tanner, “Holiday on Saturn” from Music for Heavenly Bodies (1958 Omega). USA. Electro-theremin.
  21. Rolf Harris, Introductory comments and “O Come All Ye Faithful” from The Stylophone: Traditional Tunes and Christmas Carols (1970 Dübreq ). UK. Stylophone.
  22. Mitch Miller & the Gang, “Give Peace a Chance—Thom’s Festive Remix” from Peace Sing-Along (1970 Atlantic). USA. This is a tune that I remixed with other recordings.
  23. Jon Hassell, “Dreaming” from Listening to Pictures (Pentimento Volume One) (2018 Ndeya). Europe. Teenage Engineering OP-1 Portable Synthesizer, Sampler, and Controller, trumpet, keyboards, electronics.

 

The Archive Mix in which I play two tracks at the same time to see what happens.

For this episode, I am featuring two remixes that I did over the course of holiday seasons past.

  1. Thom Holmes, Happy Christmas (War is Over) Sliding Moment mix (excerpt) (2001).
  2. Thom Holmes. Kung fu holiday movie times (excerpt) (2000).
Sounds of Industry

Sounds of Industry

December 13, 2020

Episode 20

Sounds of Industry

Industrial Noise Music

Playlist:

  1. Throbbing Gristle, “Maggot Death Pt 1” studio recording from The Second Annual Report (1977 Industrial Records). Chris Carter and Cosey Fanni Tutti.
  2. Peter Bartok, Peter Paul Kellog, “Pump Drill” from Sound Patterns (1953 Folkways). Recording of a pump.
  3. Pierre Henry, “Spatiodynamisme II” (excerpt) from an exhibition catalog for work by Nicolas Schöffer (1963 Éditions Du Griffon). Henry used sound materials he recorded in 1954 from a kinetic sculpture by Schöffer.
  4. David Jackman, “Machine Gun 2” from Machine Gun (2000 Die Stadt). This was the first of a series of works Jackman created using the archive recordings of the "Imperial War Museum" in London. This was an edition of 600 copies on clear vinyl.
  5. Emory Cook, “Festival” (excerpt) from Mexican Firecrackers (1956 Cook). Church bells and Firecrackers before dawn, Ajijic, Mexico.
  6. Cabaret Voltaire, “4th Shot” from the album Mix-Up (1979 Rough). Stephen Mallinder, Chris Watson, Haydn Boyes-Weston, and Richard H. Kirk.
  7. David Jackman, “Flak” from the EP Flak (2003 Die Stadt).
  8. George Engler, “Metallurgy” from The Inside Of The Outside / Or The Outside Of The Inside - Who Are They? Where Do They Come From? Why Are They Here? (1965 Serenus). A set of tape works using instruments and natural sounds set to themes of industry and space travel.
  9. George Engler, “Destruction” from The Inside Of The Outside / Or The Outside Of The Inside - Who Are They? Where Do They Come From? Why Are They Here? (1965 Serenus).
  10. Merzbow, “Material Action Track 2” from the cassette Material Action (1984 ZSF Produkt). Masami Akita and Kiyoshi Mizutani.
  11. Throbbing Gristle, “Beachy Head” from 20 Jazz Funk Greats (1979 Industrial Records). Chris Carter and Cosey Fanni Tutti.
  12. “ Engine Running” from Motor Car Noises, a sound-effects record (1931 His Master’s Voice).
  13. “Street Traffic Noises” Recorded at a London Street Junction,” a field recording. (1923 Columbia, UK).
  14. Leo Hurwitz, “City Edge: The Coves of Manhattan Island” (excerpt) from Here At The Waters' Edge 1 (1962 Folkways). Tape collage to accompany a documentary film.
  15. R. Murray Schafer, “Music of Horns and Whistles” from The Vancouver Soundscape (1973 Ensemble Productions). Bruce Davis, Colin Miles, Barry Truax, Howard Broomfield, Peter Huse, and R. Murray Schafer. All the sounds were recorded between September 1972 and August 1973. Part of the World Soundscape Project founded by Schafer.
  16. John Pfeiffer, “After Hours” from Electronomusic (1968 RCA Victrola). The sounds of office machines used in business, edited as a tape collage.
  17. Cabaret Voltaire, “Everything is True” from International Language (1993 Plastex). From the liner notes: “Abandon thinking. Everything you will hear in the next seventy-four minutes is true.” Stephen Mallinder, Chris Watson, Haydn Boyes-Weston, and Richard H. Kirk.

 

The Archive Mix in which I play two additional tracks at the same time to see what happens. Here are two more tracks of industrial music:

  • David Jackman, “Flak” from the EP Flak (2003 Die Stadt). Same as earlier track but played at 33-1/3 speed.
  • Lou Reed, Metal Machine Music, Side B, excerpt (1975 RCA).

 

For more information about the history of turntablism, read my book: Electronic and Experimental Music (sixth edition), by Thom Holmes (Routledge 2020).

 

Notes for this episode can be found on my blog: Noise and Notations.

Maximum Turntablism, Part 2

Maximum Turntablism, Part 2

December 7, 2020

Episode 19

 

Maximum Turntablism, Part 2

 

Modern Experimental Turntablism and CD Glitch Music

 

Playlist:

  1. Pierre Henry, Concerto Des Ambiguïtés parts 1,2,3,and 5(1950) from Symphonie Pour Un Homme Seul / Concerto Des Ambiguïtés (1972, Philips). Premiered on August 7, 1950.
  2. Christian Marclay, “Smoker,” (1981) from the album Records (1997). Christian Marclay, turntables and processing. Recorded on a cassette deck at home.
  3. DJ Shadow ... And The Groove Robbers, “Hindsight,” from In/Flux/ Hindsight (1993)
  4. Institut Fuer Feinmotorik, “A1” from Wenig Information: Kein Titel (1998). Recorded live between April and June 1998 in Cloister Bad Säckingen, Germany. For turntables, mixer, compressor, various processed records, paper, cardboard, scotch tape, household rubber, wire, various other odds and ends.
  5. Peter Cusack & Nicolas Collins, “Hazlitt” from ‎ A Host, Of Golden Daffodils (1999). Recorded live in concert at STEIM (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) June 1996 and at Museum für Gegenwart, Hamburger Bahnhof, (Berlin, Germany), November 1996. Electronic processes, CD, radio sources, trombone-propelled electronics, Nicolas Collins; guitar, bouzouki, whistling, electronics, sampler triggers, Peter Cusack.
  6. Gen Ken Montgomery, “Droneskipclickloop”(excerpt, 1998) from Pondfloorsample (2002). Using four CD players and curated sounds in the categories Drone, Skip, Click, and Loop. Mixed in real time at a performance at Experimental Intermedia Foundation (NY) on March 17, 1998.
  7. Crawling with Tarts, “Trecher Track” from Turntable Solos (1999). By Michael Gendreau and Suzanne Dycus-Gendreau.
  8. Yasunao Tone, “Part 1”(excerpt 1999) from Solo for Wounded CD (1999). All sounds used were from scratched CD's.
  9. Philip Jeck, “Untitled 2,” from Soaked (2002). Turntables, Philip Jeck, electronics, Jacob Kirkegaard. Recorded live at the Electronic Lounge, Moers Festival, Germany.
  10. Maria Chavez, “Jebus” from Tour Sampler (2004), recorded in Houston, Texas. Turntables and electronics by Maria Chavez.
  11. Marina Rosenfeld, “Three” from Joy of Fear (2005). Piano, turntables, dubplates, electronics, sound processing], vocals, Marina Rosenfeld. She said, “This record couldn’t exist without the small collection of one-off ‘acetate records’ (dub plates) that I’ve been making since 1997, when I first encountered Richard Simpson and his disc-cutting lathe in Los Angeles.”
  12. Luc Ferrari and Otomo Yoshihide, Slow Landing” from ‎Les Archives Sauvées Des Eaux (2008). Composed by Luc Ferrari and Turntables, Electronics, prepared phono cartridges by Otomo Yoshihide.
  13. Christian Marclay, from Record Without a Cover (excerpt, 1999). Marked with instructions, "Do not store in a protective package," my copy is a reissue of the disc first released in 1985, done by Japanese label Locus Solus. The naked record will naturally become increasingly damaged from shipping, storing, and playing the record, all becoming part of the work. In essence, the owner is implored to progressively destroy the release, allowing it to become scratched and bruised from accumulating damage that make each copy unique. My copy actually skips a lot. In the passage I am playing I often had to press the needle down a little bit to get through a skip. There is faintly recorded jazz music found on some of the disc, while other parts are pretty much composed only of surface noise.

The Archive Mix in which I play two additional tracks at the same time to see what happens. Here are two more tracks of modern experimental turntablism:

  • Tsunoda Tsuguto, “Air Pocket” (1997) from Turntable Solos (1999).
  • Merzbow, “Batztoutai—The Nightengale’s Song” (1985) from Turntable Solos (1999).

The incidental music heard while I’m speaking is from a damaged and skipping CD that I have of Sun Ra. The track is “Sound Spectra/ Spec Sket” from the album Other Planes of There (1964).

For more information about the history of turntablism, read my book: Electronic and Experimental Music (sixth edition), by Thom Holmes (Routledge 2020).

Notes for this episode can be found on my blog: Noise and Notations.

Maximum Turntablism, Part 1

Maximum Turntablism, Part 1

December 4, 2020

Episode 18

 

Maximum Turntablism, Part 1

Playlist:

  1. Ottorino Respighi, “The Pines of Rome” (1924) recorded by The Milan Symphony Orchestra conducted by Cav. Lorenzo Molajoli in November 1928.
  2. Paul Hindemith, Trickaufnahmen (1930). Recording made available by Mark Katz, author of Capturing Sound: How Technology has Changed Music (2004).
  3. John Cage, Imaginary Landscape No. 1 (1939) from The 25-Year Retrospective Concert Of The Music Of John Cage (private, 1959).
  4. Pierre Schaeffer, “Study For Piano” (1948) from Panorama Of Musique Concrète (1956).
  5. Pierre Schaeffer, “Study for Whirligigs” (1948) from Panorama of Musique Concrète (1956).
  6. Pierre Schaeffer and Pierre Henry, Symphonie Pour Un Homme Seul (1949-50) from Panorama of Musique Concrète No. 2 (1956).
  7. John Cage, Imaginary Landscape No. 5 (1952), from Imaginary Landscapes, by Anthony Braxton and the Maelström Percussion Ensemble Conducted by Jan Williams. Braxton selected the records.
  8. Milan Knížák, “Composition No. 1’ from Broken Music (1979).
  9. Milan Knížák, “Composition No. 3” from Broken Music (1979).
  10. Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five, Adventures on the Wheels of Steel (1981) from the 12” single The Message/ Adventures on the Wheels of Steel (1990).
  11. Marina Rosenfeld, “theseatheforestthegarden” (1999), from theforestthegardenthesea (1999, charhizma).

 

The Archive Mix in which I play two additional tracks at the same time to see what happens. Here are two more tracks of turntablism:

  1. DJ Shorty Blitz, a mix created for the collection Hip Hop: The Golden Era 1979-1999 (2018).
  2. Otomo Yoshihide, Turntable solo from TV Show "Doremi."

 

For more information about the history of turntablism, read my book: Electronic and Experimental Music (sixth edition), by Thom Holmes (Routledge 2020).

 

You might also be interested in the following article by Karin Weissenbrunner about turntablism: Experimental Turntablism--Historical overview of experiments with record players/records or scratches from second-hand technology.

 

Also check-out the book by Mark Katz, Capturing Sound: How Technology has Changed Music (2004).

Vintage Electronic Music from Japan, Part 2

Vintage Electronic Music from Japan, Part 2

November 26, 2020

Vintage Electronic Music from Japan, Part 2

Western Influence to Eastern Identity: Electronic Music in Japan between 1960 and 1975.

Playlist:

  1. Toru Takemitsu, “Water Music” (1960) for magnetic tape (1969, RCA Victrola).
  2. Matsuo Ohno, Takehisa Kosugi, “B.G.M. Parts A-F” from Roots Of Electronic Sound (1963). Music and effects later used for Astroboy.
  3. Maki Ishii, “Kio-oo” for piano, orchestra and electronic sounds (excerpt) from Mt. Fujiyama Suite and Dipol For Orchestra (1968, Aries).
  4. Toshi Ichiyanagi, “Love Blinded Ballad (Enka 1969)” from the Opera "From The Works Of Tadanori Yokoo" (1969). Tape collage.
  5. Toshi Ichiyanagi, “Electric Chant” from the Opera "From the Works of Tadanori Yokoo" (1969). Military music with electronic tones.
  6. Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Living Space (1969, Bijutsu Shuppan-Sha), composed for the Electric Faculty of Engineering of Kyoto University. Early Computer Music combined with Gregorian chant for Osaka Expo '70.
  7. Shibata, “Improvisation for Electronic Sounds” (1968) from Japanese Electronic Music (1971, Philips).
  8. Toru Takemitsu, “Stanza II” (1971) for harp, tape, and natural sounds from Miniatur II: Art Of Toru Takemitsu (1973, DGG)
  9. Yoshi Wada ‎– Earth Horns with Electronic Drone, excerpt, (1974, Edition Omega Point) Electronics by Liz Phillips. Pipehorn players Barbara Stewart, Garrett List, Jim Burton, Yoshi Wada. Composed by, recorded by Yoshi Wada. Recorded at Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, New York, Sunday 2-5pm, February 24, 1974.
  10. Joji Yuasa, “My Blue Sky (No. 1)” (1975. Tape parts realized at NHK Electronic music studio.

NHK = Nippon Hoso Kyokai (Japanese Broadcasting Corp.)

 

The Archive Mix in which I play two additional tracks at the same time to see what happens. Here are two more tracks of vintage Japanese electronic music:

  1. Toshi Ichiyanagi, “Sound Materials for Music for Tinguely” (1963).
  2. Makoto Moroi, “Shōsanke”for electronic sounds and Japanese traditional instruments (1968).

 

For more information about the history of Japanese electronic music, read my book: Electronic and Experimental Music (sixth edition), by Thom Holmes (Routledge 2020).

 

 

Vintage Electronic Music from Japan, Part 1

Vintage Electronic Music from Japan, Part 1

November 26, 2020

Vintage Electronic Music from Japan, Part 1

Western Influence to Eastern Identity: Electronic Music in Japan from 1953 to 1963.

Playlist:

  1. Toshiro Mayuzumi, “Les Œuvres Pour La Musique Concrète X, Y, Z” (1953).
  2. Makoto Moroi and Toshiro Mayuzumi, “7 Variations” (1956).
  3. Toru Takemitsu, “Vocalism AI (Love)” (1956).
  4. Group Ongaku, “Metaplasm Part 2” from Music of Group Ongaku (1961, SEER Sound Archive). Live performance, 1961, at Sogetsu Kaikan Hall, Tokyo.
  • Cello – Mikio Tojima
  • Cello, Drums, Tape – Shukou Mizuno
  • Guitar – Genichi Tsuge
  • Piano – Chieko Shiomi*
  • Saxophone, Tape – Yasunao Tone
  • Violin, Saxophone, Tape – Takehisa Kosugi
  1. Tadashi Mori (conductor), Akira Miyoshi (composer), opening excerpt to Ondine for orchestra, mixed chorus and electronic sounds. (1961, Time).
  2. Joji Yusa, Tracks 1-4 (1963). Incidental music for NHK Radio, based on Andre Breton's "Nadja". "The actual chart of constellations was played by three players (violin, piano, vibraphone) which was supposed as the music score. And birds' voices, electronic sound, sound generated from inside piano, through music concrete technique and constructed at the NHK Electronic Music Studio."
  3. Michiko Toyama, “Aoi No Ue (Princess Hollyhock) (Music Drama for Tape and Narration)” from Waka and Other Compositions (1960 Folkways).
  4. Joji Yuasa ‎– “Aoi No Ue” for voice and tape and based on The Tale of Genji written by Murasaki Shikibu in 11th century. Tape parts realized at NHK Electronic music studio (1961).

 

NHK = Nippon Hoso Kyokai (Japanese Broadcasting Corp.)

 

The Archive Mix in which I play two additional tracks at the same time to see what happens. Here are two more tracks of vintage Japanese electronic music:

  1. Kuniharu Akiyama, 'Demonstration' Of Nissei Theater (excerpt). Music for a public demonstration of the stage machinery of the newly opened Nissei Theatre in Tokyo (1963, Edition Omega Point)
  2. Toshiro Mayuzumi, “Mandara” for electronic sounds and voices (1969, Philips).

For more information about the history of Japanese electronic music, read my book: Electronic and Experimental Music (sixth edition), by Thom Holmes (Routledge 2020).

 

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