The Holmes Archive of Electronic Music
Rain Music

Rain Music

November 25, 2022

Episode 85

Rain Music

 

Playlist

    1. Dean Evenson, “Thunder Intro” from Forest Rain (1993 Soundings of the Planet). 0:28
    2. Ulrich Schnauss, “Molfsee” from Far Away Trains Passing By (2002 City Centre Offices). Written and produced by German artists Ulrich Schnauss. Schnauss is also a current member of Tangerine Dream, joining in 2014 and working with a renewed lineup since the death of original TG member Edgar Frose in 2015. 8:07
    3. Ana Roxanne, “It's A Rainy Day On The Cosmic Shore” from ~ ~ ~ (2019 Leaving Records). Limited edition cassette release. Ana Roxanne is an intersex Southeast Asian musician born and raised in the Bay area. Some low-fi and hi-fi rain sounds and synthesis. 5:03
    4. Paul Beaver and Bernard Krause, “Ragnarök” from Ragnarök (1969 Limelight). The duo’s first album of electronic music following the release of their Nonesuch Guide to Electronic Music (1968). They feature the Moog Modular synthesizer throughout and use it to synthesize the sounds of rain and thunder on this track. 3:22
    5. Dean Evenson, “Thunder Streams” from Forest Rain (1993 Soundings of the Planet). Everson has been producing soothing electronic and flute sounds for many years, this example is from 1993 and includes rain and thunder effects. Native and silver flutes, keyboards, Dean Evenson; harp, Dudley Evenson; cello, Jonathan Kramer; guitar, Tim McHugh; percussion, Stuart Glasser. 6:20
    6. Mystic Moods Orchestra, introductory sounds of the storm and the sea from One Stormy Night (1966 Phillips). 0:52
    7. Steve Birchall, “Summer Memories” from Reality Gates (1973 Poseidon Electronic Music Studio). An obscure and interesting album of privately produced electronic music from the early 1970s. Billed as "electronic meditations by Steve Birchall." Equipment used was a potpourri of systems, effects, and an EMS VCS-3 synthesizer: Ampex mm 1000 16 track recorder; DBX noise reduction; Spectrasonics console; Studer A-80 recorder; Eventide Clockworks Instant Phaser; Cooper Time Cube; EMT reverb; Neumann VMS 70-SX68 computerized lathe; EMS VCS-3 (Putney) synthesizer. 10:49
    8. Agostino Nirodh Fortini (Nirodh), “Aquatic Round” from Suoni Immaginari (2020 Black Sweat Records). Italian artist and release. Composed, recorded, and produced by Agostino Nirodh Fortini. 2:52
    9. Mystic Moods Orchestra, “A Dream" from One Stormy Night (1966 Phillips). In the mid-sixties, recording engineer and sound recordist Brad Miller had the brilliant idea of combining the recorded sounds of nature with sweeping, orchestral renditions of popular music. This was a series of albums intended as background mood music for couples. The subtitle on the cover of One Stormy Night is “Whoever you are, you hold in your heart the memory of…One Stormy Night.” On the back cover, it says, “A spectacular thunderstorm, the sound of rain and romantic music combine to create One Stormy Night. The Mystic Moods Orchestra has many releases in to the early 1970s, at least two of which utilized the Moog Modular synthesizer. This album, however, is pure field recordings creatively combined with music. 4:16
    10. Sanford Ponder, “Frontier” from Etosha - Private Music In The Land Of Dry Water (1985 Private Music). Arranged, produced, written, Fairlight CMI Synthesizer, Yamaha DX-7 Synthesizer, Roland GR-707 Synthesizer, Sanford Ponder; piano, Clyde Criner. 9:37
    11. D. Emmanuel, “Rain Forest Music” from Rain Forest Music (1981 North Star Productions). Private recording of electronic and acoustical music with field recording sound effects. Composed, arranged, performed, recorded by, Yairi Acoustical Guitar, Effects, 3 Sequential Circuits Pro-One Synthesizers, Crumar organ, J. D. Emmanuel. Recorded at Emmanuel's studio in Houston. Tropical birds were recorded at Houston Zoo Tropical Bird Aviary. “Rain and surf, gifts from Mother Nature. This music can be used for deep relaxation, meditation and as background for massage and counseling.” 22:00
    12. Thom Holmes, thunder record skip from a Mystic Moods Orchestra album. 0:55
    13. Hans-Joachim Roedelius, “Regenmacher” from Durch Die Wüste (Through the Desert) (1978 Sky Records). Percussion, Bass, Keyboards, Hans-Joachim Roedelius; Synthesizer (Synthesizermelodie), Möbius; EMS Synthi, Percussion, Konrad Plank. Recorded and mixed with Konrad Plank in his studio in May 1976, small changes made in January 1978 prior to release. A German electronic composer and member of Cluster in this first solo album transitions to a period of acoustic music, but there are synths being used on this track. 6:36
    14. Thom Holmes, rolling, distant thunder, field recording. 0:59
    15. Yavomag, Rubikdice & Chilx, “Tokyo Rain” from The Ronin EP (2022 Yavomag, Rubikdice & Chilx). House music with a rainy vibe. 2:23
    16. Thom Holmes, crack of thunder field recording.0:52
    17. Dean Elliott And His Orchestra, “Rain” from Zounds! What Sounds! (1962 Capitol). A funny relic from the days when mixing sounds effects into music was a fresh idea. Very cleverly edited by Phil Kaye; Producer, John Palladino. 2:49
    18. Thom Holmes, “Rain Drone” an alternate version and test for a track I later released called Requiem for the Rain (2016 not released). In this piece, I started with the sound of rainfall that I recorded and then processed it using the synthesizer component of MetaSynth to transform the raindrops and downpour into drones and harmonic points. All of the sounds in this work are derived from processing the sound of rain. 12:29
    19. Thom Holmes, thunder, field recording. 1:15
    20. Hans Zimmer and Benjamin Wallfisch, “Rain” from Blade Runner 2049 (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)(2017 Epic). Cello, Simone Vitucci, Vocals, Tristan Schulze; Guitar, Owen Gurry; exotic instruments, Chas Smith; Musical Assistance, Cynthia Park; Soundtrack Album Produced By, Ashley Culp, Kayla Morrison, Michael Hodges; Synth Programming, Hans Zimmer; Sampling Team, Raul Vega; Digital Instruments Design, Mark Wherry; Synth Design, Howard Scarr; Vocals, Avi Kaplan. 2:26

Opening and closing messages voiced by Anne Benkovitz. Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

See my blog for the Bob Moog Foundation.

For additional notes, please see my blog, Noise and Notations.

Psychedelic Japan, Part 3

Psychedelic Japan, Part 3

November 12, 2022

Episode 84

Psychedelic Japan, Part 3

 

Playlist

  1. Boredoms, “Super Going” from Super æ (1998 Birdman). Boredoms (ボアダムス), alternatively known as V∞redoms, is a Japanese experimental/noise/space rock/tribal drumming band from Osaka, founded in 1986 by Yamatsuka Eye. Known for their extended jams and heavy drumming, it is remarkable that they had some mainstream success in the 1990s. Bass, Hira; Drums, EDA; Drums, Vocals, Yoshimi P-We; Guitar, Yamamotor; Music by, Boredoms; Words By, Vocals, Tibetan Bell, Effects (EQ-phasing), Electronics, Eye. 12:26.
  2. Boredoms, “7-(Ewe Remix)” from Super Roots 7 (1998 WEA). Bass, Effects, Hilah; Drums, Percussion (Electronic), E~Da; Drums, Sampler (Samples), Percussion, ATR; Drums, Vocals, Tape (Bird Flying Sound), Keyboards (Casiotone), Yoshimi P-We; Guitar (Guitars), Yamamotor; Sampler, Synth, Kiyoshi Izumi; Vocals, Synth, Tape (Open Reel), Electronics (Vacuum Cleaner), Bell, Effects, Sounds, Electronics, Tape (Insects, Bird), Eye. 4:05
  3. OOIOO, “Oizumio” from Feather Float (1999 Polystar). Pronounced OH-EE-OH, Band formed by trumpeter and drummer for the Boredoms on a whim as the result of a photo shoot she once did. Bass, Handclaps, Maki; Drums, Handclaps, Yoshiko; Guitar, Vocals, Djembe, Bongos, Roland Juno and Casiotone synthesizers; Piano, Jew's Harp, Talking Drum, Scratches, Noises (Birds), Yoshimi; Guitar, Vocals, Handclaps, Kyoko; Producer, Yoshimi. 3:39
  4. OOIOO, “1000 Frogs And 3 Sun In A House” from Feather Float (1999 Polystar). Bass, Handclaps, Maki; Drums, Handclaps, Yoshiko; Guitar, Vocals, Djembe, Bongos, Roland Juno and Casiotone synthesizers; Piano, Jew's Harp, Talking Drum, Scratches, Noises (Birds), Yoshimi; Guitar, Vocals, Handclaps, Kyoko; Producer, Yoshimi. 10:28
  5. Boredoms, “"Ҩ" (Spiral)” from Vision Creation Newsun (2001 Birdman). There have been some live performances of this music from Vision Creation Newsun where Eye has recruited as many as twenty drummers to join the fray, all positioned in a circle with Eye conducting from the middle. And it’s said that this is not one of his most extreme performance setups. Bass, Effects, Vocals, Hilah; Drums, Percussion, Electronic Drums (Electric Pad), Vocals, ATR, E-Da; Drums, Percussion, Keyboards (Casiotone), Vocals, Yoshimi; Guitar, Vocals, Yamamotor; Vocals, Synth, Sampler (Samples), Turntables, Tape (Open Reel), Vocoder, Computer, Electronics, Edited, mixed by, Eye. 6:33
  6. Boredoms, “"↑" (Arrow Up)” from Vision Creation Newsun (2001 Birdman). Bass, Effects, Vocals (Vox), Hilah; Drums, Percussion, Electronic Drums (Electric Pad), Vocals, ATR, E-Da; Drums, Percussion, Keyboards (Casiotone), Vocals, Yoshimi; Guitar, Vocals, Yamamotor; Vocals, Synth, Sampler (Samples), Turntables, Tape (Open Reel), Vocoder, Computer, Electronics, Edited, mixed by, Eye. 6:26
  7. Adachi Tomomi, “Gamp” (2001 unofficial release). Adachi Tomomi is a performer/composer from Tokyo, Japan. He plays improvised music with voice, computer, and self-made instruments. 2:35
  8. Acid Mothers Temple & The Melting Paraiso U.F.O., “The Creation Of The Human Race” from 41st Century Splendid Man (2002 tUMULt). Bass synthesizer, bass harmonica, Tsuyama Atsushi; Drums, Yoshida Tatsuya; Electric Guitar, Synthesizer, Other Dancin' King, Hiroshi Higashi; Electric Guitar, Effects RDS 900, Synthesizer, Kawabata Makoto; Cosmic Companion, Ayano; Space Phone girl, Yoko; Synthesizer, Higashi Hiroshi; Vocals, Cotton Casino. From a picture disc version of this recording. 9:12
  9. Acid Mothers Temple & The Melting Paraiso U.F.O., “Dalai Gama” from 41st Century Splendid Man (2002 tUMULt). Bass synthesizer, bass harmonica, Tsuyama Atsushi; Drums, Yoshida Tatsuya; Electric Guitar, Synthesizer, Other Dancin' King, Hiroshi Higashi; Electric Guitar, Effects RDS 900, Synthesizer, Kawabata Makoto; Cosmic Companion, Ayano; Space Phone girl, Yoko; Synthesizer, Higashi Hiroshi; Vocals, Cotton Casino. From a picture disc version of this recording. 4:32
  10. Merzbow, “Argus” from Karasu: 13 Japanese Birds Pt. 4 (2009 Important Records). Music by Masami Akita. We included a cassette release from Akita in part 2 of this series. That was from early days for Merzbow, 1984. It seems fitting that we include a more recent CD by him here. Limited edition of 1,000 copies. Recorded and mixed in Tokyo, Feb 2009. 19:40

Opening background music: Far East Family Band, “Parallel World” from Parallel World (1976 MU Land). Music by, arranged by, Far East Family Band. Produced, recorded, computer mix by, Klaus Schulze. Recorded November 15th to December 5th 1976 at the Manor Studio, UK.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog, Noise and Notations.

See my blog for the Bob Moog Foundation.

The Ambient Spaceship Soundscape

The Ambient Spaceship Soundscape

October 30, 2022

Episode 83

The Ambient Spaceship Soundscape

 

Playlist

This soundscape is divided into the following sections:

1:13-6:50--Hyperspace sleep chamber, where the sound of a clock and synthetic white noise reminiscent of crickets are always present to soothe the unconscious minds of the sleeping crew members.

7:00-17:24--Mechanicals room

17:25-22:18--Bridge and control deck

37:12-41:18--Greenhouse and aqua culture space

42:22-53:02--Power Generator and engine room

53:02-58:34—Observation deck

Total length: 1:04

Connecting these are various sections of passageways, walking on soft and hard textured surfaces, and various computer-controlled monitors and timers heard along the way.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog, Noise and Notations.

Psychedelic Japan, Part 2

Psychedelic Japan, Part 2

October 16, 2022

Episode 82

Psychedelic Japan, Part 2

Playlist

  1. Wha Ha Ha, “On the Floor” from Wha Ha Ha (1983 Recommended Records). This group released three records in 1981, all in Japan. Recommended Records, the UK-based record maker, released this compilation of tracks taken from all three of those records. The group Wha Ha Ha ended at that point but its four principle members went on to varied musical careers. Akira Sakata is an alto saxophonist, Kiyohiko Semba is a percussionist, Mishio Ogawa is a vocalist, and Shuichi Chino is a keyboardist and electronic musician. 10:08
  2. Merzbow, “Untitled 1” from Material Action for Two Microphone (sp) (2nd version) (1984 artist cassette). Masami Akita is one of my long-time favorite Japanese electronic/noise practitioners. He would send me cassettes back in the 1980s and I’ve always tried to keep up with him. Not strictly a Japanese psychedelic artist, I include him here primarily because, like some of the other artists in this podcast, he has widespread influence on other genres of Japanese electronic music. This prolific Japanese noise artist has released over 500 recordings since 1979.Recorded at Merzbau. Tape, Recorder, Synth, Effects, Kiyoshi Mizutani; Tape, Violin, Electronics, Effects, Masami Akita. Early cassette by Akita. 22:30
  3. Yoshiaki Kinno, track 4 from unknown cassette, 1984.Japanese guitar and saxophone improviser. In the 1980's he established a cassette label featuring a wide range of improvised music. 3:32
  4. Boredoms, “Boil Out UFO” from Boretronix 88' (1988 Mega Scum Groove Inc.). I think this is their first cassette release, going back to 1988. Boredoms (ボアダムス), alternatively known as V∞redoms, is a Japanese experimental/noise/space rock/tribal drumming band from Osaka, founded in 1986 by Yamatsuka Eye. Known for their extended jams and heavy drumming, it is remarkable that they had some mainstream success in the 1990s. Bass, Hira; Drums, EDA; Drums, Vocals, Yoshimi P-We; Guitar, Yamamotor; Music by, Boredoms; Words By, Vocals, Tibetan Bell, Effects (EQ-phasing), cassette tape manipulation, electronics, Eye. 2:18
  5. Boredoms, “Untitled” (excerpt) from Boretronix 3 (1990 Ltd.). Another early cassette release from Yamatsuka Eye on his private label. This cassette consists of remixes of unreleased Boredoms material and fully explores the noise and rhythmic aspects of their work. This is an interesting prelude to their latter, more cohesive works. Bass, Hira; Drums, EDA; Drums, Vocals, Yoshimi P-We; Guitar, Yamamotor; Music by, Boredoms; Words By, Vocals, Effects (EQ-phasing), cassette tape manipulation, electronics, Eye. 12:01
  6. Otomo Yoshihide, “We Insist? A) Rinko-Gun; b) x-Day” from We Insist? (1992 Sound Factory). Japanese experimental musician, turntablist and guitarist. Additional musicians on these tracks, Bass, vocals, Numata Jun; Guitar, Saito Ken-ichi; Vocals, performer (Junk), Lim Soowoong. 5:37
  7. Omoide Hatoba, “Satellite Groove” from Kinsei (1996 Birdman). Japanese psychedelic, alternative, experimental -rock band. Alto Saxophone Isamu Kawamura, Yoshimi Yamazaki, Bass, Vocals, Drums, Percussion, Synthesizer, Drum Machine, Atsushi Tsuyama, Drums, Takashi Ogushi; Drums, Computer, Tape, Chew Hasegawa, Guitar, Vocals, Violin, Percussion, Piano, Synthesizer, Drum Machine, Seiichi Yamamoto, Tenor Saxophone, Satoshi Kawanishi, Trumpet, Yoshimi, Written by, Omoide-Hatoba. 3:53.
  8. Omoide Hatoba, “Alternative Funkaholic” from Kinsei (1996 Birdman). A&R, David Katznelson; Alto Saxophone Isamu Kawamura, Yoshimi Yamazaki, Bass, Vocals, Drums, Percussion, Synthesizer, Drum Machine, Atsushi Tsuyama, Drums, Takashi Ogushi; Drums, Computer, Tape, Chew Hasegawa, Guitar, Vocals, Violin, Percussion, Piano, Synthesizer, Drum Machine, Seiichi Yamamoto, Tenor Saxophone, Satoshi Kawanishi, Trumpet, Yoshimi, Written by, Omoide-Hatoba. 2:30
  9. Yasunao Tone, “Part I” from Solo for Wounded CD (1997 Tzadik). Yasunao Tone was one of the founding members of Japan's Fluxus movement and has also been an organizer and participant in many important music and performance groups such as Group Ongaku, Team Random (the first computer art group organized in Japan). He is a pioneer in the use of prepared CDs of which this work is a prime example. All sounds used were from scratched CD's. 14:28
  10. Changing Hands, “Spaced” from Changing Hands (1997 Medium Productions Ltd.). Written, performed, produced by, Nobukazu Takemura, Richard Barbieri, Steve Jansen. Takemura is a Japanese electronic DJ, producer, and artist. Richard Barbieri is a keyboardist, engineer (once a member of the group Japan). Steve Jansen is an engineer, drum programmer/percussionist and DJ (and brother of David Sylvian). 6:54
  11. Melt Banana, “Section Eight” from Charlie (1998 A-Zap Records). Melt-Banana is a band from Tokyo, Japan. They were formed around 1991/1992 by singer Yasuko Onuki who later recruited guitarist Ichirou Agata and added the bassist Rika. Additional drummer, Natsume. 3:49
  12. Melt Banana, “Taen Taen Taen (?)” from Charlie (1998 A-Zap Records). Melt-Banana includes singer Yasuko Onuki, guitarist Ichirou Agata, and bass player Rika. Additional musician, electronics, Oshima. 0:45OOIOO, “1000 Frogs And 3 Sun In A House” from Feather Float (1999 Polystar). Bass, Handclaps, Maki; Drums, Handclaps, Yoshiko; Guitar, Vocals, Djembe, Bongos, Roland Juno and Casiotone synthesizers; Piano, Jew's Harp, Talking Drum, Scratches, Noises (Birds), Yoshimi; Guitar, Vocals, Handclaps, Kyoko; Producer, Yoshimi. 10:28

Opening background music: Junji Hirose + Yoshihide Otomo, “Noise From Far East” and “The Time to Live and the Time to Die” from Silanganan Ingay (1989 Tanga-tanga). Self-Made Instruments, Toy Rhythm Box, Toy (Voice-Changer), Toy Autoharp, Tenor Saxophone, Junji Hirose; Turntables, Cassette Tape, Hand-Made Guitar, Small Instruments, Toys, Otomo Yoshihide.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog, Noise and Notations.

Psychedelic Japan, Part 1

Psychedelic Japan, Part 1

October 8, 2022

Episode 81

Psychedelic Japan, Part 1

Playlist

  1. Flower Travellin’ Band, “Satori Part 2” from Satori (1971 Atlantic). Japanese rock band formed in 1970 which broke up in 1973 and reformed in 2008. Guitarist Hideki Ishima is a founding member. Moving from Sapporo to Tokyo in the mid-sixties, he played with the Group Sounds band The Outlaws from 1966 to 1969. Following that he joined The Flowers, who later became Flower Travellin' Band. He is also known for inventing the sitarla, a cross between an electric guitar and a sitar. 7:04 English translation of the lyrics:

There is no up or down

Your truth is the only master

Death is made by the living

Pain is only intense to you

The sun shines every day

The sun shines every day

Freedom, freedom!

  1. The Taj-Mahal Travelers “Between 7:03~7:15P.M.” from July 15, 1972 (1972 CBS/sony). This album was recorded live at Sohgetsu Hall, Tokyo, Japan, July, 1972. Formed in 1969 this group produced entirely improvised music with a remarkably celestial sound. The ensemble regularly played throughout Japan. In 1971, on the way back from touring Europe, they financed a trip to India to see the Taj-Mahal. Upon returning, they played a benefit concert on July 15, 1972 to help pay for their return to U.K. The track heard hear was part of that live performance. Electronic Contrabass, Santoor (Suntool), Harmonica, Sheet Iron, Ryo Koike; Guitar, Percussion, Michihiro Kimura; Electronic Trumpet, Harmonica, Castanets, Seiji Nagai; Vibraphone, Santoor (Suntool), Yukio Tsuchiya; Electronic Violin, Radio Oscillators, Voice, Takehisa Kosugi; Vocals, Tokio Hasegawa. 11:17
  2. Far East Family Band, “Entering/Times” from Parallel World (1976 Mu Land). Far East Family Band was a Japanese Psychedelic-Progressive-Rock band, founded 1975. Psychedelia with synths. Recorded November 15th to December 5th 1976 at the Manor Studio, UK. Music By, Arranged By, Far East Family Band; Music producer, Fumio Miyashita; Recording producer, Recorded and computer mix by, Klaus Schulze. Band included keyboardist Kitaro until this, their third album produced by Schulze. Kitaro was inspired to venture out into solo electronic work after this album. 15:26
  3. Les Rallizes Denudes (Lay RAL-lees DEN-yoo-day) “Strung Out Deeper Than The Night,” recorded live in 1977. From a bootleg recording of “Heavier Than a Death in the Family” (2002 Not on Label). This Japanese experimental rock band formed in November 1967 at Doshisha University in Kyoto, moved to Tokyo, and was led by Takashi Mizutani (1948-2019). Performed their last gig in October 1996. 15:28 English translation of the lyrics for this song:

Deeper than the night, darker than the darkness

You woke up with blood and madness

Spread your black wings under the burning sky

You are what I want After the black sun rises

I'll meet you every time I go in the flames of ice

midnight white venom

A white horse runs through my body

The hungry beast that died in the rain

fly out the window

you shatter the mirror

you shatter the night

A whispering angel surrounds you

I send my blue breath to your center

You're what I want After the black sun rises

Enveloping you, your breath

send to your center

Deeper than night and darker than darkness

When you woke up, you took death and madness

  1. Fushitsusha, “3. すきにやればいい” (“Do It When You Want”) from Invincible (First Live)/不失者 (1989 P.S.F. Records). Guitarist Keiji Haino founded Fushitsusha in 1978. This undated track is probably from 1978 and is part of a double album of live performances spanning the previous ten years that he released in 1989. Guitar, harmonica, Keiji Haino; drums, Seijiro Muryama; drums, Akui; bass, Yasushi Ozawa; guitar, Maki Miura. 11:36
  2. High Rise “Induced Depression” from Psychedelic Speed Freaks (1984 P.S.F. Records). First recording, bootleg album. Japanese psychedelic rock band. Formed in 1982 by Asahito Nanjo and Munehiro Narita under the name Psychedelic Speed Freaks. They changed their name to High Rise when the group released their debut album in 1984. Bass, Vocals, Asahito Nanjo; Guitar (Motorcycle Fuzztone), Munehiro Narita. 3:13
  3. Ghost, “Escaped And Lost Down In Medina” from Hypnotic Underworld (2004 Drag City). Japanese experimental rock and improvisation group formed in Tokyo in 1984 and disbanded in 2014.Their gradual evolution from a guitar-based band with assorted acoustic instruments (e.g., oboe, cello, recorder) and atmosphere (e.g., water, wind) to the inclusion of electronics began in the early 2000s. I think this is their first album that actually credits synthesizers and other electronics. Acoustic Guitar (6- and 12-String), Vocals, Masaki Batoh; Drums, Tabla, Percussion, Junzo Tateiwa; Electric Bass, Contrabass, Cello, Takuyuki Moriya; Electric Guitar, Michio Kurihara; Piano, Mellotron, Korg MS-20 Synthesizer, Organ, Lute, Recorder, Celtic Harp, Kazuo Ogino; Theremin, Flute, Saxophone, Tin Whistle, Bouzouki, Other, Producer, Taishi Takizawa; Written by Ghost. 7:10
  4. Ghost, “Aramaic Barbarous Dawn” from Hypnotic Underworld (2004 Drag City). 3:15
  5. Acid Mothers Temple & The Melting Paraiso U.F.O., “In C” from In C (2001 Eclipse Records). Japanese psychedelic rock band founded in 1995 and which exists as a kind of collective with many guests. This unique entry in the Acid Mothers catalog feature an interpretation of the famous Terry Riley minimalist landmark “In C” (1968 Columbia). This version is full of the psychedelic appurtenances you would expect of Acid Mothers and somewhat follows the original score, though much of the scored piece serves as a bed for the other wonderful sounds that swirl about. Bass (Monster), Tsuyama Atsushi; Drums, Ichiraku Yoshimitsu; Electric Guitar, Synthesizer, Higashi Hiroshi; Electric Guitar, Violin, Zuruna, Synthesizer, Kawabata Makoto; Producer, Engineer, Kawabata Makoto; Vibraphone, Glockenspiel, Terukina Noriko; Voice, Cotton Casino. 20:28
  6. Kikagaku Moyo, “Kodama“ from Forest Of Lost Children (2014 Beyond Beyond Is Beyond Records). Japanese psychedelic rock band formed by Tomo Katsurada and Go Kurosawa in 2012. Bass, Kotsuguy; Drums, Vocals, Go Kurosawa; Engineer, Yui Kimijima; Guitar, Daoud Popal; Sitar, Ryu Kurosawa; Theremin, Voice, Angie Gotopo; Vocals, Guitar, Tomo Katsurada; Written-By Go Kurosawa. Another one of the acclaimed bands in the Japanese progressive psych genre, the word is they are breaking up and play their last show in Tokyo in December 2022. 4:21

Opening background music: Les Rallizes Denudes, “Oz Days (1:33)” and “Wilderness of False Flowers”(7:36) from The Oz Tapes (1973 OZ Records). Recorded at OZ, Kichijoji, Tokyo 1973. Bass, Makoto Kubota; Drums, Shunichiro Shoda; Guitar, Takeshi Nakamura; Vocals, Guitar, Takashi Mizutani.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog, Noise and Notations.

Electronic Music for Astral Tripping

Electronic Music for Astral Tripping

September 25, 2022

Episode 80

 

Electronic Music for Astral Tripping

Or, Better Music Through Pharmacology

 Playlist

  1. Hal Blaine, “Flashes” from Psychedelic Percussion (1967 Dunhill). Drums, Hal Blaine; Electronics (Moog), Paul Beaver; Keyboards, Organ, Electric Piano, Mike Lang; Percussion, Emil Richards, Gary Coleman. 2:22
  2. Raymond Scott, “LSD”public service announcement for the film, The Trip (1967), plus some electronic music snippets from Electronium (2007 Electronium). I’m not sure who the voice of the announcer is but the recording was produced by Raymond Scott and and I sandwiched the PSA between two snippets of Scott’s electronic music. Let this be a warning to you. 1:58
  3. Mort Garson, “Astral Projection” from Ataraxia–The Unexplained (Electronic Musical Impressions Of The Occult) (1975 RCA). Composed with an electronic music score (Moog Modular) by Mort Garson. 5:12
  4. Pierre Henry, “Electro-Genèse” from Mise En Musique Du Corticalart De Roger Lafosse (1971 Philips). Live improvisations recorded Feb. 15-21, 1971 by Pierre Henry using Roger Lafosse's Corticalart device, allowing one to transform brainwaves into electronic signals for further raw manipulations. Technical realization by Groupe Artec (Bordeaux) with electroacoustic equipment from Apsome and J. Heuze. I thought that we needed at least one piece that tapped directly into brain waves. 7:39
  5. Ron Jacobs, “Eating Food” and “Listening to Music” from A Child's Garden Of Grass (A Pre-Legalization Comedy) (1971 Elektra). Timely yet instantly dated, this relic capitalized on explaining marijuana to squares. The Electronic Music was by Alex Hassilev, which probably means that Paul Beaver did the synthesizer patchwork (both were involved in 1967 on the Zodiac Cosmic Sounds by Garson). 3:31
  6. Nik Raicevik, “Methedrine” from Numbers (1970 Narco). Although Raicevik went by the name 107-34-8933 for the initial release of this record on his Narco label, it was re-released by Buddha Records under the title Head by Nik Raicevik. Buddha dropped him and Raicevik went on to create several more crazy electronic albums for his Narco label. This was primarily a Moog Modular album. 5:59
  7. Steve Hillage, “Hurdy Gurdy Glissando” from L (1976 Atlantic). This album was produced by Todd Rundgren and featured some of his Utopia bandmates, Kasim Sulton (bass) and the mind-blowing Roger Powell on synthesizers (R.M.I. Keyboard Computer, Minimoog). But the star is guitarist Steve Hillage (Guitar, Guitar-synthesizer, ARP, EMS, Voice) and a 15th Century Hurdy Gurdy by Sonja Malkine. This is an extrapolation of the Donovan Leitch song, “Hurdy Gurdy Man,” also featured on the album. 8:54
  8. Eberhard Schoener and the Secret Society, “Trance-Formation” from Trance-Formation (1977 Harvest). Bass Guitar, Hansi Ströer; Choir, Members Of The Tölzer Knabenchor; Guitar, Andy Summers; Keyboards, Raimund Elleder; Orchestra, Orchestra of the Munich Chamber-Opera; Percussion, Nippi; Moog Synthesizer, Organ, Piano, Mellotron, Conductor Orchestra Conducted By, Composed By, Arranged By, Produced By, Sleeve Notes, Eberhard Schoener; Vocals, Mary Gregoriy, Monks Of The Monastery of Sama. 11:42
  9. Kitaro, “Astral Trip” from 天界 = Ten Kai / Astral Trip (1978 Wergo). Shakuhachi, Biwa, Ryusuke Seto; Sitar, Lavi; Moog, Korg, ARP, and Roland synthesizers, Koto, Mandolin, Acoustic Guitar, Drums, Percussion, Bass, Kitaro. Written and Arranged by Kitaro. 7:40
  10. Ozric Tentacles, “Lull Your Skull” from There Is Nothing (1986 Self-Released). Bass, Adam Mace; Drums, Nick Van Gelder; Guitar, Keyboards, Ed Wynne; Keyboards, Joie Hinton. 3:00
  11. Bill Nelson, “Opium” from Sounding The Ritual Echo (Atmospheres For Dreaming) (1985 Cocteau Records). "Sounding the Ritual Echo was recorded in the privacy of my own home on broken or faulty tape machines & speakers, each track possessing its own technological deformity. For this I offer no apology as the music owes its existence to a very personal & selfish obsession. As a direct result, some pieces will require a little patience.” Bill Nelson. 1:44
  12. Michael Magne, “Trip Psychiatrique” from Elements Nº 1 "La Terre" (1978 Egg). Bongos, Percussion, Grégori Czerkinsky; R.M.I. Keyboard Computer, ARP Odyssey, ARP Omni Polyphonique, ARP 2600, and Minimoog synthesizers, Clavinet D6, Electric Piano (Fender and Yamaha, composed, adapted, arranged by Michel Magne; Drums, Syn-drums, Jean-Paul Batailley. 4:35
  13. Pure Energy, “Spaced Out” from Spaced Out (12” vinyl) (1983 Say What!? Records). From the Netherlands. Need I say more? I’m not sure if this was about space or being spaced-out but it is definitely psychologically disorienting. This is the long version. 7:35
  14. Acid Mothers Temple & The Melting Paraiso U.F.O., “Stone Stoner” from Absolutely Freak Out (Zap Your Mind!!). Bass Monster Bass, Acoustic Guitar, Vocals, Other Cosmic Joker, Tsuyama Atsushi; Drums, Ichiraku Yoshimitsu; Drums, Percussion, Other Sleeping Monk, Koizumi Hajime; Electric Guitar, Synthesizer, Other Dancin' King, Hiroshi Higashi; Electric Guitar, Violin, Tambura, Effects Cosmic Ringmodulator, Rds900, Synthesizer, Organ, Electric Harpsichord, Vocals, Other Speed Guru, Producer, Engineer, Kawabata Makoto; Jew's Harp, Electric Guitar, Other Erotic Underground, Magic Aum Gigi; Narrator Cosmic Narration, Other Freak Power, Wellens Johan; Saxophone, Mano Kazuhiko; Vocals, Suzuki Chisen; Vocals, Synthesizer, Acoustic Guitar, Other Beer and Cigarettes, Cotton CasinoVoice, Other Cosmos, Ginestet Audrey; Recorded at Acid Mothers Temple and FTF Studio, May to July, 2000. Yes, this is what psychedelic music should sound like. I promise to do an entire podcast around Japanese psychedelic music soon. 16:19

Opening background music: Steve Hillage, “Hurdy Gurdy Man” (edit) from L (1976 Atlantic). Steve Hillage (Guitar, Guitar-synthesizer, ARP, EMS, Voice) and a 15th Century Hurdy Gurdy by Sonja Malkine. This is a cover version of the Donovan Leitch song, “Hurdy Gurdy Man.”

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog, Noise and Notations.

The US Open Sound Piece, 2022

The US Open Sound Piece, 2022

September 11, 2022

Episode 79

The US Open Sound Piece, 2022

This is my annual exploration of sounds from the US Open Tennis tournament, held in New York at the end of each Summer.

Playlist

The sound piece is organized into six sections, each around a different approach to processing sound.

Names of players captured in this piece include: Carlos Alcaraz, Rafael Nadal, Coco Vandeweghe, Jannick Sinner, Hubert Hurkacz, Federico Delbonis, Jesper De Jong, Frances Tiafoe, Daniil Medvedev, Casper Ruud, Cameron Norrie.

Note that the individual timings of the sections sometimes overlap.

  • Section 1. Techno beats plus tennis hits. This opens with a chair umpire announcing “out” followed by various beats, sneaker squeaks, crowd applause, various chair umpires, players hitting, thunder and rain going down a drain, more clapping, more hitting, etc. Spectral gate, delay, and reverb from Logic Pro were used to process some of the sounds, and synth ambience was created within Alchemy. 5:44
  • Section 2. Serato DJ. I used Serato DJ and its integrated looping and effects to generate this section. It was enhanced by percussion sounds added using the Logic Pro Orchestral Kit. 15.40
  • Section 3. MetaSynth CTX 1.2 processed sounds, using the Inertia effect applied to various tracks of players hitting, all layered to create an atmosphere similar to the mesmerizing effect one experiences while watching hours of tennis. 8:55
  • Section 4. Loops of hitting, audience sounds, various other noises and audio input recorded at the Open. Again, this section is multilayered to provide an appropriate ambience to the sound. Assembled in Logic Pro. 13.14
  • Section 5. Arthur Ashe. I came across this clip of tennis great Arthur Ashe giving some tennis instruction and thought it would make a great addition to the piece. I applied delay and reverb to mix up the sequence a bit. 1:50
  • Section 6. Return of the Techno part capped with a sequence of sneaker squeaking and applause loops. The loops were processing using an audio filter, spectral gate, delay, and reverb. Plus the Buchla Easel V (Arturia). 2:05

 

Opening background music: rhythms generated using Spark (Arturia).

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog, Noise and Notations.

 

Strange Synths

Strange Synths

August 27, 2022

Episode 78

Strange Synths

Little Heard Sounds from Unique Synthesizers

Playlist

  1. David Behrman, “Pools Of Phase Locked Loops,” from My Dear Siegfried (2005 XI Records). Synthesizers (homemade), David Behrman, Katharine Morton Austin. Recorded live at Radio Bremen in May 1972 and commissioned by Hans Otte. At a time when commercial models of analog synths were widely available, Behrman and other musicians such as Gordon Mumma and David Tudor insisted on creating purpose-built instruments using the same principles. Behrman explains, “The homemade synthesizers had 32 voltage-controlled triangle-wave generators built around a chip utilizing a circuit design called the Phase Locked Loop. The chip made smooth glides possible from one pitch to another. The homemade synthesizers also had voltage-controlled amplifiers, rows of small knobs and frequency counters with the aid of which the performers could retune individual oscillators during a performance.” 14:00
  2. John Ridges, “Fugue In G” (Bach) from Computer Controlled Synthesizer Performances (1977 Tesseract Records). This work was made using a computer-controlled music synthesizer which its makers dubbed Mesmerelda. It was comprised on 200 integrated circuits that could create 96 different pitches assigned to six separate channels. Only one waveform was used, a square wave, and there was no envelope control. Hence, the simple organ-like tone of the piece. 4:49
  3. John Ridges, “Ruffles” (Ridges) from Computer Controlled Synthesizer Performances (1977 Tesseract Records). From the same album comes “Ruffles” performed by composer John Ridges. This track featured a slightly more advanced computer music synthesizer they called the AD8. It featured up to eight synthesis boards each one relating to a single channel. So, eight pitches could be played at a time and there was filtering, waveform generation other than square waves, and simple envelope generation to provide a slightly more advanced sound. As Ridges wrote in the liner notes, with pride, “these pieces are generally free of the bizarre noises usually found on electronic synthesizer albums.” The pieces were recorded in real time without overdubs. 2:36
  4. Patrick Gleeson, “Star Wars Theme (Luke’s Theme)” (Williams). (1977 Mercury). Recorded and mixed at Different Fur, San Francisco, July 1977. The piece showcases various beds, rhythms, and sounds made using the E-mu modular synthesizer, also known as an Eµ synthesizer (it’s original name). "Selections from the film performed on the world's most advanced synthesizer." Drums, Billy Cobham, Harvey Mason, James Levi, Ronnie Beck; Lyricon, Lenny Picket; Vocals, Sarah Baker; keyboards, performer (Breath Controller), engineered, produced, arranged, and conducted by Patrick Gleeson. 5:36
  5. Bennie Maupin, “Crystals” from Moonscapes (1978 Mercury). Eµ synthesizer (E-mu Modular Synthesizer) programmed by Patrick Gleeson, who owned Different Fur Studios in the San Francisco area and owned an Eµ modular synthesizer (see the earlier Star Wars album which also featured this same synth.) Here, we have a different treatment of the same instrument by jazz woodwind player Maupin, who played Soprano Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Bass Clarinet, Flute, Marimba, Glockenspiel, Eµ Synthesizer, and Computone Synthesizer Winddriver on this album. I picked this track because this is most stripped-down arrangement featuring only Maupin playing the Eµ synthesizer and other instruments. 1:19
  6. Sylvester, “You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real)” from Step II (1978 Fantasy). One of the few albums to feature EML (Electronic Music Laboratories) Modular Synthesizers. String synthesizer, Electro-comp 101 synthesizer and 200 expander unit, Oberheim DS-2 Sequencer, Effects , Pat Cowley; organ, Electric piano, Clavinet, Michael C. Finden; Percussion, David Frazier; Producer, Lead Vocals, Piano, Sylvester. EML was a Connecticut-based synth maker that was around from about 1970 to 1984. They were best-known for their Electro-comp modular synths. The 101 was a duophonic semi-modular 44-note synth and the model 200 was an expander unit that added ring modulation, spring reverb, and high and low filters to the setup. It was interesting to hear this Moroder-like pulsating synth sound coming from something other than a Moog. 6:34
  7. Pere Ubu, “I Will Wait” from Dub Housing (1978 Chrysalis). This second album from this Ohio group always figured high on my playlist of favorites. I was mostly fascinated by the synthesizer fills and hijinks by Allen Ravenstine that punctuated much of the group’s music with the quirkiest of sounds, all blended and mixed to provide many weird hooks and twists. This is another example of the EML, Electro-comp duphonic modular synthesizer although almost used in a polar opposite way than Sylvester. This is a unique sound from the time. Performers, Allen Ravenstine, David Thomas, Scott Krauss, Tom Herman, Tony Maimone. Engineered by Ken Hamann at SUMA Studios, Painesville, Ohio, 8-9/78. Ravenstine is still active and an electronic musician although he has left the EML for other synthesizer frontiers. He remains very much the experimental improviser. 1:45
  8. Pere Ubu, “Navvy” from Dub Housing (1978 Chrysalis). Performers, Allen Ravenstine, David Thomas, Scott Krauss, Tom Herman, Tony Maimone. Engineered by Ken Hamann at SUMA Studios, Painesville, Ohio, 8-9/78. Features sounds of the EML Electro-comp modular synthesizer by Allen Ravenstine. 2:40
  9. Pere Ubu, “On the Surface” from Dub Housing (1978 Chrysalis). Performers, Allen Ravenstine, David Thomas, Scott Krauss, Tom Herman, Tony Maimone. Engineered by Ken Hamann at SUMA Studios, Painesville, Ohio, 8-9/78. Features sounds of the EML Electro-comp modular synthesizer by Allen Ravenstine. 2:37
  10. Pascal Languirand, “O Nos Omnes” from De Harmonia Universalia (1980 Polydor). I am featuring a track that uses, among other instruments, the Farfisa Synthorchestra, the famous Italian’s company entry into the string synthesizer fray. The Syntorchestra was split into two keyboard sections, strings (polyphonic), and mono synth voices. It was a hybrid organ and synthesizer and used much by Klaus Schulze and other German electronic musicians for the short time that it was available from 1975 to 1978. Nine slider controls were positioned next to a 3-octave keyboard and provided some “chaotic” control episodes for this much beloved and rare keyboard. 7:16
  11. Moebius, “Clone Zone” from Moebius (1979 Plastic Poison). Yes, a progressive rock group that utilized the modular synthesizers developed by Serge Tcherepnin, Rich Gold, and Randy Cohen at CalArts in late 1972. By the mid-1970a, Tcherepnin left CalArts and began to manufacture his instruments in Hollywood. Serge modules were designed to bring many elements of the circuits controllable by the performer, patching them in unusual ways beyond what was considered normal for a given module. The model used on this album probably had a 16-stage sequencer introduced by the company, and I think you can hear such patterns in this song. Listen for the bubbling, sequenced sounds that are contrasted to the monophonic solos of the Minimoog and patch sounds of the ARP Odyssey. I think the track opens with the Serge pattern. Drums, Evan Kaplan; Minimoog synthesizer, Bruce Courtois; Roland Sh3a, AP 2600 synthesizers, Steve Roach; Serge modular, Minimoog synthesizer, vocals, written by, Bryce Robbley; Serge modular synthesizer, Doug Lynner. 4:55
  12. Moebius, “Song For Lya,” from Moebius (1979 Plastic Poison). Serge, Oberheim, and Minimoog synthesizers, vocals, written by, Bryce Robbley; Serge, Oberheim synthesizers, written by, Doug Lynner; Violin, John Stubbs. Listen closely to tune-out the parts by the Odyssey and Minimoog and you will experience a lovely bed laid down by the Serge. Moebius had three members, one a violinist, heard in this tune blending with the Serge. Although the group used a Sennheiser vocoder on another track, the vocal distortion on this track may have actually been the voice processed with the Serge. 3:15
  13. Henry Kucharzyk, “Play Dot Sam” from Walk The Line - Three New Works By Henry Kucharzyk (1985 Artifact Music). This work is performed at the Samson Box at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA), Stanford University, Palo Alto, California. This track is an escapee from the 1970s but nonetheless fills a void in that period when commercial synthesizers were moving to digital technology and were quite expensive. The Samson Box was a computer-based digital synthesizer created in 1977 by Peter Samson, who worked at the university. Samson stands for the “Systems Concepts Digital Synthesizer. It was a one-off special-purpose dedicated audio computer designed for use by student composers at Center for Computer Research in Musical and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford University. 3:06
  14. Salvatore Martirano, “The SalMar: Part One” from The SalMar Construction (2014 Sub Rosa). Another escapee from the 1970s was this performance at IRCAM in Paris in 1983. Salvatore Martirano, an American composer, invented the one-of-a-kind Sal-Mar Construction designed for real-time performance of electronic music. It was created from 1969 to 1972 at the University of Illinois. The analog synthesizer looked like a large drawing table with an array of 291 touch-sensitive connections to enable the sound generating circuits. Behind it all were some computer circuits salvaged from the Illiac II computer music system and they generated random sequences with which the performer could interact while managing four parallel processes governing the 16 oscillators, applying pitch, timbre, amplitude and envelope parameters to the sound. Martirano toured the world with the performing/composing music machine and described his live performances in the following manner: “The composer, in performance, interacts with the machine as it composes, creating spontaneously four melodic lines which move throughout the concert space via a network of 24 overhead speakers.” This performance was by Martirano while in Paris at IRCAM. 18:59
  15. Herbie Hancock, “Rough” from Future Shock (1983 Columbia). Hancock was well known as an experimenter of new synthesizer technology. During the early stages of the home computer revolution, Hancock used an AlphaSyntauri synthesizer as part of his ensemble of instruments. The AlphaSyntauri was an add-in synth for the Apple II computer, with its own sound-generating circuit board. The company was around from about 1980 to 1985. Its claim to fame what that it was much more affordable than the digital synthesizers made by New England Digital and Fairlight, each of which cost in the $30,000 to $50,000 range. The AlphaSyntauri was $1500. At this price you got 16-voice polyphony, 16 digital oscillators, and envelope generator, keyboard, and a sequencer capable of storing up to 7000 notes. It’s affordable sequencing was a major attraction. This was before the Apple Macintosh was introduced, and with that the AlphaSyntauri was made immediately obsolete. But not before Hancock was able to work it into some of his electronic jazz tracks. If you listen carefully you can pick-out the sounds of the AlphaSyntauri because of all of the other synths and instruments on this track. Backing Vocals, Bernard Fowler, Grandmixer D.ST., Nicky Skopelitis, Roger Trilling; Bass, Bill Laswell; Drums, Sly Dunbar; Lead Vocals, Lamar Wright; Fairlight CMI Synthesizer, AlphaSyntauri Synthesizer, Emulator Synthesizer, Herbie Hancock; Prophet-5 Synthesizer, Michael Beinhorn; Turntables, Voice, Grandmixer D.ST. 6:55

Opening background music: P.F.M. (Premiata Forneria Marconi), “Storia In "LA"” from Jet Lag (1977 Asylum Records). Italian progressive rock band founded in 1970. Album recorded at Kendun Recorders, Burbank, California, January, 1977 and Scorpio Sound Studio, London, February, 1977. Mixed at Scorpio Sound Studio, February 1977. Mastered at RCA Studio, London. Bass, Moog B12 Synthesizer, Patrick Djivas; Drums, Percussion, Franz Di Cioccio; Electric Piano, Organ, Moog Synthesizer, Flavio Premoli. 6:28

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog, Noise and Notations.

Sounds of War

Sounds of War

August 14, 2022

Episode 77

Sounds of War

 

Playlist

  1. This Heat, “The Fall of Saigon” from Made Available (John Peel Sessions) (1996 These Records). Composition and performance by This Heat. Recorded in 1977 for the John Peel Show at BBC Maida Vale Studios, London.6:05
  2. Peggy Gou, “Troop” from Art Of War EP (2016 REKIDS). Produced, composed, and performed by Peggy Gou. 5:53
  3. David Jackman, “Flak” from Flak (2003 Die Stadt). 10", 45 RPM, Limited Edition. 6:00
  4. David Jackman & Philip Sanderson, “Terrain” from Terrain (2002 Die Stadt). 10", Single, 45 RPM, Limited Edition. 6:31
  5. David Jackman, “Wietzendorf” from Flak (2003 Die Stadt). 10", 45 RPM, Limited Edition. 5:35
  6. David Jackman, “Machine Gun Fighting” from Machine Gun Fighting (2000 Die Stadt). Limited edition of 500 copies. Original sound IWM [Imperial War Museum] London. 8:18
  7. Outputmessage, “War.Experiment 0001” from Love & War (2020 Outputmessage). Produced, composed, and performed by Bernard Farley (Outputmessage). 24:42
  8. Thom Holmes, “World of Noise” from Interferences (2022 Wave Magnet). Produced, composed, and performed by Thom Holmes. The idea came from interviews with WWI veterans who described the experience of frontline battles as being in a “world of noise” for long periods. 16:42

 

Opening background music: David Jackman, “Adrift” from Terrain (2002 Die Stadt). 10", Single, 45 RPM, Limited Edition. 3:38

 

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog, Noise and Notations.

More Black Techno Matters

More Black Techno Matters

July 30, 2022

Episode 76

More Black Techno Matters

 

Playlist

 

  1. Drexciya, “Digital Tsunami” from Harnessed The Storm (2002 Tresor). “Filtered through dimensional waves by Drexciya.”
  2. Drexciya, “Aquatic Cataclysm” from Harnessed The Storm (2002 Tresor). “Filtered through dimensional waves by Drexciya.”
  3. Green Velvet, “Sleepwalking” from Whatever (2001 Music Man Records). Produced, programmed, and written by Green Velvet.
  4. Jlin, “Black Origami” from Black Origami (2017 Planet Mu). Produced by Jerrilynn Patton. Gary, Indiana.
  5. 3MB Featuring 'Magic' Juan Atkins, “Die Kosmischen Kuriere” from 3MB Feat. Magic Juan Atkins E.P. (1993 NovaMute). Producer, written and mixed by Juan Atkins, Moritz von Oswald, Thomas Fehlmann.
  6. Loraine James, “Let’s Go” from Reflection (2021 Hyperdub). Produced by Loraine James.
  7. Hand, “Calling” from Intuition EP (2015 Acacia). Detroit. Produced, written, and arranged by K. Hand.
  8. Loraine James, “Loll” from Detail (2017 Fu Inle Records). Produced by Loraine James.
  9. Hand, “Everybody (Tommy Largo Remix)” from Intuition EP (2015 Acacia). Detroit. Produced, written, and arranged by K. Hand.
  10. Hand, “Aquatics” from Hot Steel. (2020 Trip Recordings). Produced, written, and arranged by K. Hand (Kelli Maria Hand). This was the result of receiving an invite from musician Nina Kraviz who sent out a call to artists to stream one of their unreleased works; all genres are welcome. After the stream took place, the favourite tracks were signed to produce the Hot Steel release. Available on Bandcamp.
  11. LTJ Bukem, “Rainfall” from Raw Music Material - Electronic Music DJs Today (2002 Not on Label). Composed, played, and mixed by LTJ Bukem.
  12. Robert Hood. “Kick Dirt” from Raw Music Material - Electronic Music DJs Today (2002 Not on Label). Music by Robert Hood.
  13. Robert Hood. “Parade” from Internal Empire (1994 Tresor). Detroit. Music by Robert Hood.
  14. Scan 7, “Dark Corridor” from Dark Territory (1996 Tresor). Scan 7 a collective of Detroit techno artists, led by Lou Robinson and including DJ Red Line.
  15. Scan 7, “Dark Territory” from Dark Territory (1996 Tresor). Scan 7 a collective of Detroit techno artists, led by Lou Robinson and including DJ Red Line.
  16. Venus Ex Machina, “Blood Moon (Solar Mix)” from Lux. (2021 AD93). Ex Machina is a composer, sound designer and interdisciplinary artist based in the UK.
  17. Venus Ex Machina, “Mysterium ” from Lux. (2021 AD93). Venus Ex Machina is a composer, sound designer and interdisciplinary artist based in the UK.
  18. Venus Ex Machina, “Quaraquara” from Lux. (2021 AD93). Venus Ex Machina is a composer, sound designer and interdisciplinary artist based in the UK.
  19. Jeff Mills, “IOK-1” from The Universe: Galaxy 1 (2022 Axis). Written, performed, and produced by Jeff Mills.
  20. Jeff Mills, “IOK-4” from The Universe: Galaxy 1 (2022 Axis). Written, performed, and produced by Jeff Mills.
  21. Jeff Mills, “The Speed Of Light” from The Universe: Galaxy 1 (2022 Axis). Written, performed, and produced by Jeff Mills.
  22. Jeff Mills, “Canis Major Overdensity” from The Universe: Galaxy 1 (2022 Axis). Written, performed, and produced by Jeff Mills.

Opening background music: Jeff Mills, “Spider Formation” from The Other Day (1997 Axis). Written, performed, and produced by Jeff Mills.

Connect with Black Techno Matters and Bernard Farley.

Listen to the Blackness is Revolutionary playlist on Spotify. As of this podcast, this playlist curated by Bernard Farley features more than 1,100 techno tracks by black artists.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog, Noise and Notations.

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