The Holmes Archive of Electronic Music
Reggae Loves Electronic Keyboards

Reggae Loves Electronic Keyboards

July 27, 2021

Episode 50

Reggae Loves Electronic Keyboards

 

Playlist

  1. The Wailers, “Lonsome Feelings” (sp) from The Wailers, The Mighty Vikings ‎– Lonsome Feelings/There She Goes (1964 Wincox). 45 RPM. Combo organ.
  2. Glen Adams, “Warming Up The Scene” from Roy Shirley/Glen Adams ‎– Warming Up The Scene/Lonely Girl (1968 Giant) 45 RPM. Combo organ.
  3. The Mellotones, “Uncle Desmond” from Sir Lord Comic & The Upsetters/The Mellotones ‎– Bronco (Django Shoots First)/Uncle Desmond (1968 Upsetter). 45 RPM. Combo organ.
  4. Lester Sterling, “Reggie In The Wind” from Lester Sterling/The Soul Set (3) ‎– Reggie In The Wind/Try Me One More Time (1968 Gas). 45 RPM. Combo organ riffs. A reggae version of Dylan’s “Blowing in the Wind” by Jamaican saxophonist Sterling.
  5. The Upsetters, “Soul Juice” from Dave Barker/The Upsetters ‎– Prisoner Of Love/Soul Juice (1968 Upsetter) 45 RPM. Piano and combo organ.
  6. Eric Barnet, “The Horse” from Eric Barnet ‎– The Horse/Action Line (1968 Gas). 45 RPM. Combo organ, chords and riffs.
  7. Winston Wright and King Stitt, “Fire Corner” from The Dynamites ‎– Fire Corner (1969 Trojan). LP featuring keyboardist Wright. Likely a Hammond organ.
  8. The Upsetters, “Medical Operation” from The Upsetters ‎– Night Doctor/Medical Operation (1969 Upsetter). 45 RPM. Produced by Lee Perry. Probably a Hammond organ.
  9. Reggaeites, “Harris Wheel” from Derrick Morgan/Reggaeites ‎– Moon Hop/Harris Wheel (1969 Crab). 45 RPM. Combo organ.
  10. Upsetters, “Drugs And Poison” from Upsetters ‎– Stranger On The Shore/Drugs And Poison (1969 Upsetter). Probably a Hammond Organ. Winston Wright? Produced by Lee Perry.
  11. Ansel Collins, “Night Of Love” from Derrick Morgan/Ansel Collins ‎– Copy Cat/Night Of Love (1969 Beverley’s Records). 45 RPM. Hammond organ.
  12. Ansel Collins, “Staccatto” from Pam Brooks/Ansell Collins ‎– Oh Me Oh My/Staccatto (1970 Big). 45 RPM. Hammond organ.
  13. Joe Gibbs, “Common People Reggae” from Nicky Thomas/Joe Gibbs ‎– Don't Touch Me/Common People Reggae (1970 Jogibs). 45 RPM. Produced by Joe Gibbs. The B side is a Hammond organ instrumental of “Love Of The Common People” by Nicky Thomas.
  14. Lord Comic, “Rhythm Rebellion” from Lord Comic/Roy Richards ‎– Rhythm Rebellion/Reggae Reggae Children (1970 Coxsone). 45 RPM. Hammond organ. I love the rap-like rhymes in the vocal.
  15. Bob Marley & The Wailers, “Soul Rebel” from Soul Rebels (1970 Trojan). LP. Produced by Lee Perry. Maybe Glen Adams on combo organ.
  16. Zorro Five, “Reggae Meadowlands”from Zorro Five ‎– Reggae Shhh!/Reggae Meadowlands (1970 Decca). 45 RPM. Combo organ.
  17. Lee Perry & The Upsetters, “Son Of Thunder” from Bob Marley & The Wailers/Lee Perry & The Upsetters ‎– My Cup/Son Of Thunder (1970 Upsetter). 45 RPM. Produced by Lee Perry, with lots of reverb for the voice and a bubbling organ part.
  18. The Maytals, “Peeping Tom” from The Maytals/Beverley's All-Stars* ‎– Peeping Tom (1970 Beverley’s Records). 45 RPM. Combo organ. This piece plays twice but is part of an original single—the second part is instrumental and the organ is prominent.
  19. Robert Lynn & Sound Dimension, “Zip Code” from Robert Lynn & Sound Dimension/Carl Bryan & Sound Dimension ‎– Zip Code/Cover Charge (1971 Banana). Hammond organ, around the time that the reggae synthesizer appeared.
  20. Vulcans, “Joe Kidd” from Star Trek (1972 Trojan). LP. Guitar, Trevor Starr; keyboards, Joe Sinclair; Minimoog and ARP synthesizers, Ken Elliot.
  21. Vulcans, “Journey into Space” from Star Trek (1972 Trojan). LP. Guitar, Trevor Starr; keyboards, Joe Sinclair; Minimoog and ARP synthesizers, Ken Elliot.
  22. Vulcans, “Star Trek” from Star Trek (1972 Trojan). LP. Guitar, Trevor Starr; keyboards, Joe Sinclair; Minimoog and ARP synthesizers, Ken Elliot.
  23. Colonel Elliott & The Lunatics, “Guns Of The Martian Giants (Guns Of Navarone)” from Interstellar Reggae Drive (1973 Rhino). LP. Synthesizers, Ken Elliot.
  24. Jimmy Cliff, “World of Peace” from Unlimited (1973 EMI). LP. Hammond organ, Winston Wright; Mellotron, Flute, Strings, Cello, Synthesizer, Leslie Butler; Bass, Jackie Jackson; Drums, Winston Grennan; Piano; Gladstone Anderson; Lead Guitar, Hux Brown ; Percussion, Bingi Bunny, Bongo Herman, Denzil Laing, Sticky; Rhythm Guitar; Hux Brown; Tenor Saxophone, Flute, Tommy McCook Trombone, Alto Saxophone, Ron Wilson; Trumpet, Bobby Ellis; Backing Vocals, Bob Taylor, Glenton Taylor, Jean Watt, Judy Mowatt, Nora Dean, Ralston Webb, Rita Marley, Tesfa McDonald, The Heptones, Zoot Simms.
  25. Jimmy Cliff, “I've Been Dead 400 Years” from House Of Exile (1974 EMI). LP. Bass, Jackie Jackson; Hammond organ, Synthesizer, Clavinet, Winston Wright; Guitar, Hux Brown, Dad (Duggy) Bryan; Piano, Gladstone Anderson; Saxophone, Flute, Tommy McCook; Trumpet, Bobby Ellis.
  26. Ansel Collins, ‎”Far East Special” from The Admirals/Ansel Collins ‎– Natty Should Be Free/Far East Special (1975 Angen). This sounds like a synth and a Clavinet using a Wah Wah and echo. Very cool, Ansel.
  27. Bob Marley & The Wailers, “Positive Vibration” from Rastaman Vibration (1976 Island). LP. Backing Vocals, I Threes; Bass, Guitar, Percussion, Aston "Family Man" Barrett; Drums, Percussion, Carlton Barrett; Engineer, Alex Sadkin, Errol Thompson, Jack Nuber; Keyboards, possibly a Wurlitzer Omni 6500 dual keyboard synthesizer, Bass, Percussion, Backing Vocals, Tyrone Downie; Lead Guitar, Donald Kinsey; Lead Guitar, Rhythm Guitar, Percussion, Earl Smith*; Lead Vocals, Rhythm Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Percussion, Bob Marley; Mixed By, Aston Barrett*, Chris Blackwell; Percussion, Alvin "Seeco" Patterson; Producer, Bob Marley & The Wailers.
  28. Third World, “Sun Won’t Shine” from Third World (1976 Island). Bass, Richie; Drums, Cornel; Keyboards and synthesizers, Ibo; Lead Guitar, Cat; Lead Vocals, Prilly; Percussion, Carrot.
  29. Culture, “Two Sevens Clash” from Two Sevens Clash (1977 Joe Gibbs Record Globe). Alto Saxophone; Herman Marquis; Arranged by Errol T., Joe Gibbs; Bass, Lloyd Parks; Drums,  Noel Dunbar (Sly); Guitar,  Eric Lamout, Lennox Gordon, Robert Shakespear; Keyboards,  Errol Nelson, Franklyn Waul, Harold Butler; Percussion,  Sticky; Producer,  Errol T., Joe Gibbs; Tenor Saxophone,  Tommy McCook; Trombone,  Vin Gordon; Trumpet,  Bobby Ellis.
  30. Babatunde Tony Ellis, “Ire” from Babatunde Tony Ellis ‎– Disco Baby/Ire (1980 MNW). Backing Vocals, Monica Bring; Bass, Backing Vocals, Virimuje "Willie" Mbuende; Drums, Performer [Siren], Backing Vocals, Bosse Skoglund; Guitar, Minimoog, Hammond Organ, Clavinet, Piano, Percussion, Vocals; Tony Ellis; Percussion; Per Cussion; Trombone;  Anders Nordkvist, Renzo Spinetti; Trumpet, Tomas Sjögren.
  31. Delroy Wilson, “Hard to Say I’m Sorry” from Reggae Classics (1984 top Rank). ; Synthesizer, Robert Lyn; Backing Vocals, Dean Fraser, Dessie Roots, Junior Chin, Rudy Thomas; Bass,  Derrick Barnett, Lloyd Parkes; Drums,  Sly Dunbar; Horn,  Dean Fraser, Junior Chin; Lead Guitar,  Willie Lindo; Lead Vocals,  Delroy Wilson; Organ,  Robert Lyn, Winston Wright; Piano,  Robert Lyn; Rhythm Guitar,  Willie Lindo.
  32. Burning Spear, “Resistance” from Resistance (1985 Wea International). LP. Synthesizer; Richard Johnson, Robby Lyn; Written-By, Co-producer, Vocals, Drums [Akete]; Winston Rodney; Bass;  Anthony Bradshaw; Lead Guitar;  Lenford Richards*; Percussion;  Alvin Haughton; Piano, Organ, Keyboards [Casio Mt40 & Fender Rhodes];  Richard Johnson (2); Rhythm Guitar;  Devon Bradshaw; Saxophone;  Dean Frazer*; Trombone;  Nambo Robinson*; Trumpet;  Bobby Ellis, David Madden.
  33. Keith Sterling & The Turbos, “Computer Broom” from Computer (1985 Sunset Records). LP. Synthesizers, Keith Stirling. Collection of cover versions using the “Sleng Teng Riddim,” originally a Rock preset on the 1985 Casiotone MT-40 keyboard. It helped bring reggae into the digital era. This is an entire album of variations using the preset.

Background music:

  • The Dynamites, “John Public (Tom Hark)” from Trojan Records Instrumental Reggae Volume 1 (2015 Trojan). Originally released as a single in 1969.
  • The Beverley's All Stars, “The Monster” from Trojan Records Instrumental Reggae Volume 1 (2015 Trojan). Originally released as a single in 1970.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog Noise and Notations.

Computer Music Murmurs in the UK: Peter Zinovieff and EMS

Computer Music Murmurs in the UK: Peter Zinovieff and EMS

July 11, 2021

Episode 49

 

Computer Music Murmurs in the UK: Peter Zinovieff and EMS

 

Playlist

  1. Peter Zinovieff, “Agnus Dei (Excerpt)” from Electronic Calendar - The EMS Tapes (2015 Space Age Recordings). Early sound sampling, circa 1968. Note the briefness of the digital samples of the voice. 5:33
  2. Peter Zinovieff, “January Tensions” from Cybernetic Serendipity Music (1968 ICA). Zinovieff’s notes, from the album: “Computer composed and performed. This piece is very much for computer both in its realization and composition. The rules are straightforward. The computer may begin by improvising slowly on whatever material is firs chooses. However, once the initial choices are made then these must influence the whole of the rest of the composition. The original sounds must occasionally be remembered and illustrated but a more and more rigid structure is imposed on the randomness. The piece was electronically realized and composed in real time by an 8K PDP8/S and electronic music peripherals.” 9:48
  3. Harrison Birtwistle and Peter Zinovieff, “Chronometer” (1975 Argo). "Chronometer", for electronic tape, was composed in 1971, and realized by Peter Zinovieff at EMS Putney. From the liner notes: “Chronometer is entirely made up from the sounds of clock mechanisms which have been computer-analyzed and regenerated onto 8 tracks (reduced in this recording to two.)” Air and contact microphones were used to collect sounds from widely different sources, Big Ben being a primary one. The program used to reinterpret the graphic and numerical music score was MUSYS by EMS. 24:19
  4. Audio Past Present & Future - Presented with Audio Magazine (1972, IPC Magazines flexi-disc). A flexi-disc narrated by Richard Baker that was produced in EMS studios and includes a snipper of “A Lollipop for Papa” by Peter Zinovieff, various synthesized instrumental examples, and an excerpt of “Ultra-Vivaldi” by Francis Monkman of Curved Air. 6:48
  5. Curved Air, “Ultra-Vivaldi” from Phantasmagoria (1972 Warner Brothers). Francis Monkman playing the EMS Synthi 100. Recorded at EMS studios. 1:31
  6. Curved Air, “Whose Shoulder Are You Looking Over Anyway” from Phantasmagoria (1972 Warner Brothers). Francis Monkman playing the EMS Synthi 100. Recorded at EMS studios. This track consists of tapes of Sonja's voice analyzed and processed by a PDP8/L computer and a Synthi 100 synthesizer. The final tapes were edited and prepared for performance by Francis Monkman and Robert Carvell. This is a good example of sound sampling that is more advanced than heard on the earlier track, “Agnus Dei.” 3:31
  7. Peter Zinovieff, “A Lollipop For Papa” from Electronic Calendar - The EMS Tapes (2015 Space Age Recordings). From 1974. 6:26
  8. Peter Zinovieff, “Raasay Digitised” from Electronic Calendar - The EMS Tapes (2015 Space Age Recordings). Even more voice sampling, blended deftly with electronic sounds. Circa 1975. 2:20
  9. Peter Zinovieff, “Now’s The Time To Say Goodbye” from Electronic Calendar - The EMS Tapes (2015 Space Age Recordings). . Circa 1975. 4:11

Background music:

Peter Zinovieff and Alan Sutcliffe, “ZASP Parts 1 To 3” from Electronic Calendar - The EMS Tapes (2015 Space Age Recordings). A more sophisticated example of early music programming by Alan Sutcliffe using a Dutch computer, the ICL 1905 made by International Computers Limited (ICL). 5:11

 

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog Noise and Notations.

An East River Park Sound Walk in New York

An East River Park Sound Walk in New York

July 4, 2021

Episode 48

An East River Park Sound Walk in New York

 

Playlist

  1. East River Park Sound Walk, New York City, June 26, 2021. The sound of a single recording made while circling the park. It is heard simultaneously on three tracks: 1) the unadulterated recording; 2) the recording played through a transducer and an antique gasoline can; and 3) the recording played through a transducer and a one-gallon ceramic preservation crock. Each of the versions has its own character of sound that highlights different frequency bands.
  2. Peter Kilham and Alfred L. Hawkes, Side 2 of The Swamp In June (1964 Droll Yankees Inc.). Monophonic LP. Recording by Peter Kilham, narration (side 1) by Alfred L. Hawkes. Recorded on Joe Ranger's swamp, North Pomfret, Vermont. From the liner notes: “On this recording you will hear the sounds of swamp citizens ranging from the buzzing of flies through the pained groaning of pickerel frogs to the mewing of baby beavers in their lodge, and the startling splashes of their parents. Birds provide the melody in the background, while insects add rhythm and continuity. The narrator identifies the sounds, and comments on swamp life on one side of the record. The bizarre swamp chorus is heard alone on the reverse side.”
  3. RCOA Stereo Systems Test Record, side 1 (1974 Yorkshire Records). Art Direction, Lucie Leniston; Producer, Harold L. O'Neal Jr. From the liner notes: “The Ultimate High-Fidelity Test Record.” Side 1 includes: Reference Tone 1kHz; White Noise For Channel Identification; Left & Right; Channel Identification; Channel Balance Test; Left Channel Frequency Test 50, 100, 200, 400, 700, 1,000, 2,000, 4,000, 6,000, 8,000, 10,000; Spot Checks; 30Hz - 2kHz Sweep; Right Channel Frequency Test (Same As Left Channel); Cartridge Tracking Test (Tone Bursts With Specific Frequency With Noise); Anti-Skating Test.

Background music: A mix of Shirley Bassey singing “Light My Fire” (1970 United Artists Records) and city sounds recorded by Thom Holmes, including sounds of the handball court at First Avenue and Houston St. and the sounds of the fountain area behind Village View apartments on First Avenue.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog Noise and Notations.

The French Love Their Synthesizers

The French Love Their Synthesizers

June 20, 2021

Episode 47

The French Love Their Synthesizers

Playlist

  1. Roger Roger (Cecil Leuter), “Duetto (La Concierge Et Le Monsieur Du Premier)” and “Rondeau Cucu” from Musique Idiote (1970 Neuilly). I believe this is the first library music record that he composed for Moog Modular synthesizer. The tunes are pretty simple, either one track or two tracks recorded in a multitracked sequence. 1:33 and 1:41
  2. Jean-Pierre Ferland, “It Ain't Fair” from ‎Jaune (1970 Barclay). This song has English lyrics on an album that includes tunes in both French and English. This album was recorded in Montreal during the early days of synthesizer use at Andre Perry’s studio. Perry’s uncredited Moog Modular synthesizer adds little touches throughout, especially on this song. Ferland was a widely popular French-Canadian singer/songwriter. 2:03
  3. Heldon, “Zind” from Electronique Guerilla (1974 Disjuncta). Bass Guitar, Pierrot Roussel; Drums, Coco Roussel; Guitar, Alain Renaud; Piano, EMS VCS 3 Synthesizer, Patrick Gauthier; EMS VCS 3 Synthesizer, Georges Grumblatt; Vocals, Gilles Deleuze; Written by Richard Pinhas. 2:18
  4. Heldon, “Back to Heldon” from Electronique Guerilla (1974 Disjuncta). Bass Guitar, Pierrot Roussel; Drums, Coco Roussel; Guitar, Alain Renaud; Piano, EMS VCS 3 Synthesizer, Patrick Gauthier; EMS VCS 3 Synthesizer, Georges Grumblatt; Vocals, Gilles Deleuze; Written by Richard Pinhas. 8:31
  5. Heldon, “Ouais, Marchais, Mieux Qu'en 68 (Ex : Le Voyageur)” from Electronique Guerilla (1974 Disjuncta). Bass Guitar, Pierrot Roussel; Drums, Coco Roussel; Guitar, Alain Renaud; Piano, EMS VCS 3 Synthesizer, Patrick Gauthier; EMS VCS 3 Synthesizer, Georges Grumblatt; Vocals, Gilles Deleuze; Written by Richard Pinhas. 4:22
  6. Philippe Grancher, “Birds, Birds” from 3000 Miles Away (1975 PÔLE 0014). Composed, Arranged by, Piano, Electric Piano, Synthesizer (String Ensemble), Mellotron, Organ, Effects, Philippe Grancher; Synthesizer, Jean-Louis Rizet; Bass, Gérard Bouquin; Drums – Pascal X; Electric Guitar, Arnaud Chevalier. 8:27
  7. Henri Roger, “‎Asyle Cosmique” from Images...(1975 Pôle Records). Composed and performed by, instruments, Mini Korg Synthesizer, Elka Rhapsodie, Yamaha YC 45 D organ, Electric Guitar, Henri Roger. 10:25
  8. Michel Madore, "Stanley” from Le Komuso À Cordes (1976 Barclay). Another product of Montreal. Guitar, Keyboards, Synthesizer, Piano, Cimbalom [Cymbalom], Ocarina, Producer, Arranged By, Written-By, Michel Madore; Drums, Tubular Bells, Gong, Percussion, Mathieu Léger; Electric Bass, Contrabass, Errol Walters; Electric Piano, Piano, Phillippe Beck; Saxophone, Synthesizer, Ocarina, Percussion, Arranged By, Ron Proby. 3:52
  9. Space Art, “Psychosomatique,” from Trip In The Center Head (1977 IF Records). Music by Dominique Perrier, Roger Rizzitelli playing the following Instruments: Polymoog, Minimoog, Hammond Organ, Fender Piano, Piano, Drums, Clavinette, Arp Odyssey, Eminent, Violon électrique Flanger, Guitare électrique, Vibraphone, Bell-Trees, Gong, Timbales, Grosse caisse symphonique, Korg, Mellotron. 10:38
  10. Jean Michel Jarre, "Oxygène Parts 1, 2, 3” from Oxygène (1977 Polydor). Composed By, Producer, ARP Odyssey synthesizer, EMS A.K.S. and V.C.S. 3 Synthesizers, R.M.I. Harmonic synthesizer, Farfisa organ, Eminent organ, Mellotron, Rhythmin' Computer, Jean-Michel Jarre. 18:41
  11. Clearlight, “Spirale D'Amour” from Visions (1978 Polydor). Arranged by Clearlight, Cyrille Verdeaux; Bass, Philippe Melkonian; Drums, Percussion, Jacky Bouladoux; Electric Bottleneck Guitar Cosmique, Christian Boule; Flute, Tenor Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone, Didier Malherbe; Grand Piano, ARP Odyssey Synthesizer, Gong, produced by Cyrille Verdeaux; Synth Programmed by Francis Mandin; Minimoog Synthesizer, Luc Plouton; Violin, Bass Violin, Didier Lockwood. 7:33
  12. Richard Pinhas, “Iceland Parts 1 and 2” from Iceland (1979 Polydor). Composed By, Performed By, Electronics, Guitar, Richard Pinhas. Pinhas was also a member of Heldon, whose music combined rock and electronic. 10:43
  13. Tai Phong, “Thirteenth Space” from Last Flight (1979 Warner Brothers). Piano, (Acoustic, Electric), Synthesizer, Celesta, written by Pascal Wuthrich and Michaël Jones; Drums, Stephan Caussarieu; Engineer, Khanh; Guitar, Bass, Vocals, Michaël Jones. 4:56
  14. Tai Phong, “Last Flight” from Last Flight (1979 Warner Brothers). Piano (Acoustic, Electric), Moog Synthesizer. EML synthesizer, Pascal Wuthrich; Vocals, Electric Guitar, and written by, Khanh; Drums, Stephan Caussarieu; Engineer, Khanh; Guitar, Bass, Vocals, Michaël Jones. 9:58
  15. Szajner, “Brute Reason” from Brute Reason (1983 Island). Composed By electronics, keyboards, Bernard Szajner; Bass, Felipe Maujardo; Drums, Kirt Rust. Guitar, Xavier Geronimi; Saxophone, Schroeder; Vocals, Percussion, Joji Hirota. Szajner is also the man who invented the laser harp, used by Jarre in performance. 5:18

 

Background music:

  • Space Art, “Speedway,” from Trip In The Center Head (1977 IF Records). Music by Dominique Perrier, Roger Rizzitelli playing the following Instruments: Polymoog, Minimoog, Hammond Organ, Fender Piano, Piano, Drums, Clavinette, Arp Odyssey, Eminent, Violon électrique Flanger, Guitare électrique, Vibraphone, Bell-Trees, Gong, Timbales, Grosse caisse symphonique, Korg, Mellotron. 2:54
  • Szajner, “Without Leaving” from Brute Reason (1983 Island). Composed By electronics, keyboards, Bernard Szajner; Bass, Felipe Maujardo; Drums, Kirt Rust. 3:46

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog Noise and Notations.

The Electro-Acoustic Sounds of Tennis

The Electro-Acoustic Sounds of Tennis

June 13, 2021

Episode 46

The Electro-Acoustic Sounds of Tennis

Playlist

  1. “USOpen2016”—electro-acoustic work for ambient sounds, audio processing, and synthesis. Included are the following sounds, roughly in this sequence (names denote players we hear exchanging shots either in practice or in actual play): Coco Vandeweghe and Simona Halep; Andy Murray and Dan Evans, practicing volleys; Stan Wawrinka, ground strokes; Juan Martin Del Potro and David Goffin, ground strokes; rain on my microphone; F-train subway; dripping rain; court squeegee workers; Ivo Karlovic and Donald Young, match play. 39:32
  2. “USOpen2017b and beats”­—electro-acoustic work combining drumbeats with ambient and processed tennis sounds, roughly in this sequence (names denote players we hear exchanging shots either in practice or in actual play): Andy Murray and Thai-Son Kwiatkowski practicing; Rafa Nadal and Fernando Verdasco practicing; walking behind a custodial cart; Maria Sharapova, practicing solo; outdoor handball court, Houston and First Ave.; Andrea Petkovic practicing doubles; 9:55.

 

Background music:

  • Included are ambient sounds roughly in this sequence (names denote players we hear exchanging shots either in practice or in actual play): Ivo Karlovic playing Donald Young; Caroline Wozniacki, practicing alone with her coach; sounds of a match on the Grandstand; sounds of a match at Court 11; crickets on the grounds; badminton sound; squash sound; platform tennis sound; racquetball sound; ping pong sound; the F Train (subway) on the way to the US Open; Andy Murray practicing with Dan Evans; Novak Djokovic practicing with Alexander Zverev;  and Juan Martin DelPotro practicing with David Goffin.

 

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

 

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog Noise and Notations.

Made at Home—Electronic Music Basement Tapes

Made at Home—Electronic Music Basement Tapes

June 6, 2021

Episode 45

Made at Home—Electronic Music Basement Tapes

Playlist

  1. Jean-Michel Jarre, “Happiness is a Sad Song” from Rarities (2011 Disques Dreyfus). This track is from 1968, before Jarre began studying at the GRM music program directed by Pierre Schaefer. This piece was composed at home using only a microphone, two tape recorders, and splicing tape and was included on this collection of his early works. 5:49
  2. Deuter, “Der Turm/FluchtPunkt” from D (1971 Kuckuck). Home recordings of music composed and played by Georg Deuter. Lots of echo applied to ambient sounds, instrumental drones, and percussion. 4:29
  3. Geodesium, “Free Fall” from Geodesium (1977 Loch Ness Monsters Productions). EMS Synthi AKS synthesizer, Mellotron, Mark C. Petersen. Music composed, self-produced and recorded at home. This music was featured in shows at the Fiske Planetarium at the University of Colorado. 5:20
  4. Don Slepian, “Glimmerings” from Electronic Music From The Rainbow Isle (1978 Don Slepian self-released cassette). EML 400/401 Sequencer, double-speed piano, ARP Odyssey, bass, phase-shifted lap steel guitar, strings, Don Slepian; drums, Ron Jacobs. Don produced this music for a dance by Akiko Masuda and released it on a 7-inch vinyl in 1981. Slepian came from Santa Monica, California and released several albums on cassette until the late 1980s. 3:31
  5. Don Schertz, “Mockin’ Bird Hill” from BITS.AND.BYTES (Bach, Binary & Boolean) (1978 Schertz Computer Music). LP programmed by Donald Schertz and synthesizer builder John Pratt. This is a fascinating computer music album dating from the very dawn of home computing used for music making. The music was written in software to be performed by the Altair 8800A using three identical voice circuits and used control techniques of the voltage-controlled synthesis. Storage and routines were loaded using cassette. The timing of the notes and the assignment of scales are completely variable, which gives this experiment such a funky and complex sound. From Monterey, California. 1:20
  6. Archie Ulm, “MacArthur Park” from Experience (1979 Archie Ulm self-released album). Yamaha EX-1 electronic keyboard, mixing, production, Archie Ulm. After Hugo Montenegro’s Moog rendition of this Jimmy Webb song, I like this one. The EX-1 was one of the most expensive and rarest of synthesizers, costing about $35,000 in 1977 when Archie Ulm used it. The EX-1 featured two five-octave fully polyphonic keyboards, organ style tabs and polyphonic analog synthesizer sounds, which could be slaved; a topmost three octave mini-keyboard for monophonic synthesizer which could also be slaved to the upper organ manual; and a monophonic analog synthesizer bass played by pedals or slaved to the lower keyboard. It also featured a drum machine, arpeggiator, and chord accompaniment. Ulm was connected to various Yamaha keyboard competitions and took this instrument on the road for his night club act. I think Archie is still active. I have seen notices of his organ playing for churches and wine tastings from Colorado to California. 4:32
  7. Men-Eject, “Apologize” from Apologize/Draw (1980 Men/Eject self-released 7” 45). The only known recording from this New York group with the Cabaret Voltaire sound. I don’t know who was actually in the group. The single came packaged with a photocopy sleeve and oversized lyric sheet stuffed inside. Engineered by Takashi Tsuruta and Naka Suzuki. 3:38
  8. Zach Swagger, “Empty Highways” and “Going Going Gone” from Empty Highways (1980 It’s Gone). Privately released 7-inch 45 by Zach Swagger. All sounds and effects by Zach Swagger. Ambient sounds, tape loops, verging on noise/industrial style. 3:20 and 3:29
  9. Delta, “Mr. E. Chaos” from Diagrams Of Women (1981 Classified Records 7-inch 45). Synthesizer, Melodica, Vocals, Dee McCandless; Synthesizer, Gene Menger; Bass, Rude B.; Guitar, Vocals, Jonathan Hearn. Versions with triangle shaped picture sleeve. 3:07
  10. Hidden Combo, “Driving Through Frankie Valley” from King Of Siam/Music From A Sophomore (1981 Phantom Plaything 7-inch 33-1/3). Bass Guitar, Bob Dickie; Guitar, Jacy Webster; Buchla Electric Music Box, Charles Cohen. Comes in an oversized folder-style picture sleeve, with folded insert. This track was recorded “live at home.” 3:01
  11. Wrinklemüzik, “Rein” from Wrinklemüzik: A Move To The Right (1981 Kenn Lowy self-released 7-inch 33-1/3). Synthesizers, electronic guitar, energy bow, rhythm machine, Kenn Lowy. Recorded live at the “public access synthesizer studio,” New York City. 6:33
  12. Tone Poets, “Pente” from Pente/No Work Today! (1983 Millet Music). A Self-released, single-sided flexi-disc by David Mandl. Flexi-disc made by Eva-tone, which was an affordable alternative to vinyl releases. Drum programming, synthesizer, David Mandl. According to a note from Mr. Mandl at the time, this was “recorded in my home 8-track studio and is available for $1.00.” 2:49
  13. Vox Populi, “Ectoplasmies II, I, III, IV” from Ectoplasmies (1983 VP 231). Self-produced 7-inch 33-1/3 from France. Synthesizer, Effects, Tape, Voice, Percussion, Flute, Bass, Gnouf Tap; synthesizer, B. Wolf. Four synth tracks from this French industrial-leaning group. 6:47
  14. Projekt Electronic Amerika, “Round Trip (Reprise)” and “Year 90-10” from Tanzmusik (1985 Projekt). Limited private release LP of 250 copies. This was an elaborate solo project by artist Sam Rosenthal who played all of the instruments and recorded the music. He also drew the cover art. Equipment used: Korg Poly-61 (non-MIDI); Realistic Moog synthesizer on the track “Round Trip (Reprises);” Boss DR-110 Dr. Rhythm Graphic; Aphex Aural Exiter; Roland SDE-1000 and SDE-2000 digital delays; Forman Reverb. 1:51 and 5:30
  15. Conrad Schnitzler, “Die Rebellen Haben Sich In Den Bergen Versteckt” from Blau (1974 Conrad Schnitzler self-released album). Electronic rhythms, manual filtering, modular synthesis, phase effects on tape. Minimalist and original. Schnitzler kept it simple, no elaborate embellishments or musical arrangements needed. 18:45

Background music used during this episode (excerpts):

Conrad Schnitzler, “Untitled” from The Red Cassette (1973 Conrad Schnitzler self-released cassette). Electronic rhythms, manual filtering, modular synthesis, phase effects on tape. Excerpt.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog Noise and Notations.

Vintage Dutch Electronic Music

Vintage Dutch Electronic Music

May 30, 2021

Episode 44

Vintage Dutch Electronic Music

Playlist

  1. Hans Kox, “Three Pieces For Electronic Organ” from Anthology Of Dutch Electronic Tape Music: Volume 1 (1955-1966) (1978 Composer’s Voice). Tape piece from 1955 recorded at the Studio of The Netherlands Radio Union. An early demonstration of tape editing techniques created in a makeshift studio, using an electronic organ as the main audio signal. 3:56
  2. Ton De Leeuw, “Study” from Anthology Of Dutch Electronic Tape Music: Volume 1 (1955-1966) (1978 Composer’s Voice). Tape piece from 1957 recorded at the Studio of The Netherlands Radio Union. Composed using serial techniques and a 31-interval scale. 6:57
  3. Henk Badings, “Genese” from Electronic Music (1960 Philips). Tape piece from 1958 for five audio-frequency oscillators. From the Philips Studios (Eindhoven, The Netherlands). 9:55
  4. Dick Raaijmakers, “Contrasts” from Electronic Music (1960 Philips). Tape piece from 1959 for Ondes Martenot, Pulse-generator with resonance circuits, Noise-generator, Octave- and Half Octave-filters. From the Philips Studios (Eindhoven, The Netherlands). 4:49
  5. Frits C. Weiland, “Studie In Lagen En Impulsen” from Anthology Of Dutch Electronic Tape Music: Volume 1 (1955-1966) (1978 Composer’s Voice). Tape piece from 1961 and the Studio of Utrecht University. A purely work with time suspended in layers of sound. 4:54
  6. Tom Dissevelt, “Gamelan” from Anthology Of Dutch Electronic Tape Music: Volume 1 (1955-1966) (1978 Composer’s Voice). Tape music from 1963-64 created at the Studio of Utrecht University. An electronic simulation of the rhythmic effects of gamelan music. 3:12
  7. Gorter, “K 45” from Anthology Of Dutch Electronic Tape Music: Volume 1 (1955-1966) (1978 Composer’s Voice). Tape piece from 1964-65 created at the CEM Studio, Bilthoven. Created in class taught by Gottfried Michael Koenig. “Starting from basic material of ten chords each, consisting of four sine-wave tones, an end product was achieved in twenty-nine phases by means of transposition, synchronization, rhythm, “chopping up,’ reverberation, reversal, filtering, ring modulation, dynamics, etc. used individually or in combination.” (Klaus Gorter). 5:46
  8. Dick Raaijmakers, “Canons 1-2” from Ballad 'Erlkönig'/5 Canons (1981 Composers' Voice). Tape piece from 1967. Realized in the studio of the Royal Conservatory of The Hague. 10:32
  9. Gottfried Michael Koenig, “Funktion Grün” from Terminus II/Funktion Grün/Phonothese/Chants De Maldoror (1970 DGG). Tape piece from 1967. Realized at the Studio for Electronic Music at the Utrecht State University. Construction and the order of the sounds was “calculated by a computer.” 8:13
  10. Ekseption, “Epilogue” and “Finale: Music for Mind/Theme Julia” from Beggar Julia's Time Trip (1970 Philips). Piano, Spinet, Xylophone, Hammond], Pipe Organ, Mellotron, Percussion, Rick Van Der Linden; Guest, Alto Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone, Tonytone, Percussion, Electronic Effects, Tony Vos; Bass, Cor Dekker; Drums, Kettle drums, Dennis Whitebread; Tenor Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone, Flute – Dick Remelink; Trumpet, Pocket Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Rein Van Den Broek; Vocals, Percussion – Michel Van Dijk; Engineer, Electronic Effects, Jan Schuurman; Recording, Mixing Engineer, Electronic effects, Gerard Beckers. Made in Holland. I’m not sure what the “Tonytone” instrument is. Perhaps the Theremin-like sound heard on this track? Or was that a sliding note on a synthesizer? 4:56
  11. Jurriaan Andriessen, opening four-track sequence, “She Walks In Beauty,” “Overtones,” “Beyond the Veil” and “Roundelay” from The Awakening Dream (1977 Park). Dreamy progressive rock solo album recorded in 1977 at Dream-Studio, The Hague. Moog, Minimoog, Fender Rhodes, Hohner Clavinet, Organ, Acoustic Grand Piano, Jurriaan Andriessen. “A trance symphony composed by Jurriaan Andriessen.” 12:23
  12. Ton Bruynèl, “Translucent II” from Ton Bruynèl (1981 Composers' Voice). “Translucent II” for orchestra & tape (1977-78) recorded on in 1978 by the Netherlands broadcasting organization (NOS). Electronic realizations created at Bruynèl’s private studio. Symphony parts performed by the Utrecht Symphony Orchestra. 9:44
  13. André De Koning, “Nieuws In Het Kort” from Contactdisc 1 (1983 Stichting Stopcontact). This track is from a compilation of mostly Dutch artists. Voice, noise, and rock. 2:02
  14. Doxa Sinistra, “Portable Electronics” from Contactdisc 1 (1983 Stichting Stopcontact). This track is from a compilation of mostly Dutch artists. Electronic rock in the style of Cabaret Voltaire. 3:04

Background music used during this episode:

Tom Dissevelt, “Whirwinds (Torbellinos)” from The Fascinating World Of Electronic Music (1959 Philips). Tape music realized at the Philips Studios (Eindhoven, The Netherlands). Also known as “Whirling” and “Sonik Re-entry” on some English pressings. 2:33

Link to the Institute of Sonology, Royal Conservatoire The Hague.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog Noise and Notations.

A Conversation with Pamela Z

A Conversation with Pamela Z

May 23, 2021

Episode 43

A Conversation with Pamela Z

Music in the Time of Pandemic

 

Playlist

  1. TIMES3 (TIMES X TIMES X TIMES), commissioned by The Prototype Project (2021). Composer Pamela Z and theatre artist Geoff Sobelle collaborate on a site-specific sonic journey through Times Square – past, present and imagined… What was this place? Composed by Pamela Z; written by Geoff Sobelle; instrumentalists, Tom Dambly, Crystal Pascucci, Todd Reynolds; vocals, Pamela Z; voices sampled from Eric Sanderson, Alan Weisman, Robyn Orlin, Lisa McGinn, Stefanie Sobelle, Craig Dykers, Erick Gregory, Colleen Jennings-Roggensack, Jack Tchen, Adrienne Brown, Pamela Z, and Geoff Sobelle.

Background music used during this episode (exceprts):

  • Pamela Z, "Quatre Couches" in a solo concert as part of VoxLab Vårfest at Vega Scene in Oslo, Norway, on April 11, 2019. Pamela Z, electronics and voice processing using MAX MSP gesture-controlled MIDI instruments.
  • Pamela Z, “Three Vertical Kilns (Carbon Song Cycle)” Live at BAM/PFA (April 12, 2013). Excerpt from the complete performance of Carbon Song Cycle, a work for chamber ensemble and expanded cinema by composer Pamela Z and video artist Christina McPhee.
  • Ink: commissioned and presented by VOLTI (2021); artistic director Robert Geary; executive producer Barbara Heroux; performed by VOLTI. Music and video by Pamela Z.
  • TIMES3 (TIMES X TIMES X TIMES), commissioned by The Prototype Project (2021). Composer Pamela Z and theatre artist Geoff Sobelle collaborate on a site-specific sonic journey through Times Square – past, present and imagined… What was this place?
  • Pamela Z, “Badagada”from A Delay Is Better (2004 Starkland). Composed by, recorded by, performer, producer, liner notes, Pamela Z.

Additional works and links for Pamela Z:

  • Website for Pamela Z
  • TIMES3 (TIMES X TIMES X TIMES), commissioned by The Prototype Project (2021). Composer Pamela Z and theatre artist Geoff Sobelle collaborate on a site-specific sonic journey through Times Square – past, present and imagined… What was this place?
  • Ink: commissioned and presented by VOLTI (2021); artistic director Robert Geary; executive producer Barbara Heroux; performed by VOLTI. Music and video by Pamela Z.

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog Noise and Notations.

 

New Arrivals to the Archives

New Arrivals to the Archives

May 16, 2021

Episode 42

New Arrivals to the Archives

New-Old Recordings Making it into the Archives

Playlist

  1. Vincenzo Agnetti, “Pieces Of Sound” from Revolutions Per Minute (The Art Record) (1982 Ronald Feldman Fine Arts Inc.). Reading and tape composition by Italian artist, photographer and writer Vincenzo Agnetti. 4:38
  2. Chris Burden, “The Atomic Alphabet” from Revolutions Per Minute (The Art Record) (1982 Ronald Feldman Fine Arts Inc.). Solo poetry piece by Chris Burden. 0:31
  3. Canarios, “Genesis” and “Prana” from Ciclos (1974 Ariola). Spanish album of symphonic space rock. Adapted by E. Bautista (from Vivaldi’s Four Seasons); Bass, Synthesizer, Theremin, Christian Mellies; Drums, Electronic Drums (Moog), Timbales, Triangle, Vocals, Castanets, Maracas, Bells, Temple Bells, Flexotone, Glockenspiel, Rototoms, Gongs, Percussion (Bambus), Goblet Drum (Dharbuka), Alain Richard; Electric Piano, Hammond Organ,Piano, Violin, Mathias Sanveillan; Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Lyre, Echoplex, Phase Shifter, Vocals, Antonio García De Diego; Synthesizer, Keyboards, Mellotron, Digital Frequency Meter, Ribbon Controller, Vocals,Teddy Bautista. This is pretty audacious. 7:22
  4. Holger Czukay, “Ho-Mai-Nhi (The Boat Woman Song)” from Technical Space Composer's Crew ‎– Canaxis 5 (1969/ RE 2018). Basic tape composition work from this German pioneer, circa 1968. Originally privately released in 1969 by Technical Space Composer's Crew and titled "Canaxis 5". Later reissued as "Canaxis" by Holger Czukay and Rolf Dammers. Czukay studied under Karlheinz Stockhausen from 1963–1966, and in 1968 co-founded the German rock group Can. 7:31
  5. Deuter, “Atlantis” from D (1971 Kuckuck). Georg Deuter, produced and composed on tape. Early work from this German ambient, electronic composer. 6:04
  6. Far East Family Band, “The God Of Wind,” “Moving, Looking, Trying, Jumping In A Maze,” “Wa, Wa (Yamato)” from The Cave: Down To The Earth (1975 Mu Land). Bass, Akira Fukakusa; Drums, Shizuo Takasaki; Guitar, Fumio Miyashita, Hirohito Fukushima; Keyboards, Akira Ito, Fumio Miyashita, Masanori Takahashi; Percussion, Masanori Takahashi; Vocals, Hirohito Fukushima. Japanese psychedelic jam band. Spacey, fun, rollicking organs and guitars. 4:53
  7. Langston Hughes, conclusion of Rhythms Of The World (1955 Folkways). African American poet and author Hughes narrated this work based on his book "The First Book of Rhymes.” The “documentary sounds” were field recordings used to underscore the poetry. 5:08
  8. Steve Hackett, “Jacuzzi” from Defector (1980 Charisma). Solo album from guitarist for Genesis. This is a track of largely keyboard-like sounds featuring such instruments as the Matell Optigan and Roland GR500 Guitar Synthesizer, played by Hackett. Bass, Dik Cadbury; Concert Flute, Alto Flute, John Hackett; and keyboards by Nick Magnus. 4:37
  9. Pedro Morquecho, “Mi Corazon Es Un Violin (Fox)” from Pedro Morquecho (Su Novacord Y Su Orquesta) (1965 Orfeon). Mexican keyboard artist who found his groove with the amazing Hammond Novachord. Here he plays some numbers for the night life, popular favorites designated for different kinds of dances, such as Afro-Beguine, Fox, and Rhumba. 3:33
  10. Enoch Light And The Light Brigade, “Swamp-Fire” from Dimension •3• (1964 Command). This is one of the many amazing instrumental albums produced by Enoch Light for Command in the sixties. In this case, we have Dick Hyman on organ, Tony Mottola on guitar and Alto Saxophone by Walt Levinsky. I also hear an uncredited appearance by an Ondioline, a monophonic organ known to be used by Enoch Light on many albums. 2:19
  11. Akira Itoh, “Life from the Light 光からの生命” from Inner Light Of Life / やすらぎを、君に (1978 King Records). Alto Saxophone, Flute, Vocals – Noboru Kimura; Electric Bass – Keiju Ishikawa; Electric Guitar, Vocals – Nobuo Hajime; Piano, Vocals – Kenji Kijo; Synthesizer – Akira Ito; Vocals – Goko Kunikida. Ito was previously a member of the Far East Family Band (see earlier track). 6:53
  12. Alain Markusfeld, “1st movement” from Contemporus (1979 Egg). French singer and songwriter. Composed by, arranged By, ARP Polyphonic, ARP Prosoloist, Acoustic Piano, electric guitar, Organ, Percussion, Cymbals, Triangle, Marimbas, Harmonica, Handclaps, Vocals – Alain Markusfeld; vocals Patricia Markusfeld. 3:06
  13. Masquerade, “Guardian Angel” from Masquerade ‎– Guardian Angel (1983 Metronome). PPG Waveterm synthesizer, Chris Evans. I don’t know much about this group, other than this song and it was basically one person playing the instruments, the short-lived PPG Wave synthesizer, also used by Gary Numan, Depeche Mode, among others. 4:27
  14. Bruno Menny, “Orbite Autour De La Planète 3” from Cosmographie (1972 Arion). This is unique album from the engineer who was also a student of composer Iannis Xenakis. This is his only album. It is a blend of concrete and synthesized sounds. 19:12
  15. Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark, “Maid Of Orleans (The Waltz Joan Of Arc)” from Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark (1981 Dindisc). A 7-inch single. Bass, Guitar, Horns, Mellotron, Organ, Percussion (Acoustic, Electronic), rhythm program, Synthesizer, Vocals, Andrew McCluskey; Drums, Percussion (Acoustic, Electronic), Synthesizer Bass, Malcolm Holmes; Mellotron, Melodica, Organ, Percussion (Acoustic, Electronic), Piano, rhythm program, Synthesizer, Vocals, Paul Humphreys; Organ, Piano, Synthesizer, Michael Douglas. 4:12
  16. Harold L. O'Neal Jr. (producer), “Ultimate Obstacle (All Tests Simultaneously)” from RCOA Stereo Systems Test Record (1972 Yorkshire Records). Test record using electronic sounds and tone clusters, bursts. “The Ultimate High-Fidelity Test Record.” 2:04
  17. Karlheinz Stockhausen, “Mikrophonie I” (1964), first part, from Mikrophonie I & II / Prozession (1969 CBS). From France comes this boxed set. Electronics (Filters), Hugh Davies, Jaap Spek, Karlheinz Stockhausen; Electronics (Microphone) – Harald Boje*, Johannes G. Fritsch; Percussion (Tam-tam), Alfred Alings, Aloys Kontarsky. Mikrophonie I for Tamtam, Two Microphones, Two Filters and Potentiometers Essentially, a piece for cardboard tubes scraped on cymbals and mixed with electronic amplification and reverberation. Hugh Davies worked with Stockhausen during this period. Recorded at West German Radio Studios, Cologne, December 17 & 18, 1965. 7:24
  18. Donna Summer, “Grand Illusion” from The Wanderer (1980 Geffen). Words and vocals by Donna Summer; Music by Giorgio Moroder; Synthesizers, Harold Faltermeyer, Sylvester Levay; Guitar, Jeff Baxter, Steve Lukather, Tim May; Drums, Percussion, Keith Forsey; Bass Guitar, John Pierce, Lee Sklar, Les Hurdle. 3:50
  19. Ruth White, David White, Gary Maynard, Animals Are Wonderful (1982 Tom Thumb Records). Synthesizers, Ruth White. Yes, that’s the Ruth White of sixties Moog Modular fame. She also made her way with children’s activity records such as this. 2:16

 

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog Noise and Notations.

 

Sounds for Museums

Sounds for Museums

May 9, 2021

Episode 41

Sounds for Museums

Sound Art to Accompany Exhibits

Playlist

  1. François Baschet, Bernard Baschet, and Jacques Lasry, “Sonatine (3 Mouvements)” from Structures for Sound (1965 BAM). The exhibition 'Structures For Sound-Musical Instruments' by François and Bernard Baschet was shown at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, from October 4 to December 5, 1965. Although not heard in the exhibit, this set of compositions was co-marketed by the museum and BAM and clearly intended as a takeaway souvenir. The recordings were made in France, and released there as Les Structures Sonores Lasry-Baschet, then repackaged for the US market and exhibit. The piece was written by Jacques Lasry.
  2. Various Artists, Art By Telephone (1969 Museum Of Contemporary Art Chicago). Artists were asked to phone-in instructions for a work of art to be exhibited at Art by Telephone, held at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. The museum released a recording of the phone calls and sold it at the exhibit. Here are four excerpts by John Giorno, Dick Higgins, Sol Lewitt, Richard Serra, and Jack Burnham. In total, 38 artists provided instructions that were included on the album.
  3. Audio Arts: Volume 3 No 4 Side A (1977 Audio Arts). Excerpts from a radio work by John Carson broadcast by Downtown Radio, Belfast in 1977. The program was a compilation of recordings made in June 1977 at Documenta VI, an international exhibition of contemporary art in Kassel, West Germany. We hear two excerpts, the first from artist Wolf Vostell which opens with the sound of bubbling water and the second a sound work by Achim Freyer. These audio works played in the exhibit. Other portions of the complete cassette recordings alternated between statements/interviews and sound environments/installations. Audio Arts was a magazine in continuous publication for 33 years and ran to 24 volumes, each of four issues.
  4. Various artists, from Sound (1979 Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art). Four of the tracks from this collection are included: Terry Fox, “Labyrinth Scored For II Cats” (1979); Jim Gordon, “Piece For Synthesizers, Computers And Other Instruments” (1979); Doug Hollis, “Aeolian Harp” (1975-76), composed 1975-76 at the San Francisco Exploratorium; Bill Fontana, “Kirribilli Wharf” (1979). Album produced for SOUND. An exhibition of sound sculpture, instrument building and acoustically tuned spaces. Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art July 14-August 31, 1979. P.S.I. New York, September 30-November 18, 1979.
  5. Jeff Gordon, “Everyone’s An Artist” (1984). Vocal Jeff Gordon and Mug Maruyama; Programming, Graham Hawthorne; Emulators/Keyboards, Jeff Gordon. Gordon produced Revolutions Per Minute (The Art Record), a collection of audio tracks by artists released as a double LP. This track by Gordon was not included in that release but I think was used for a traveling exhibition featuring sound, The RPM Touring Exhibitions, designed by Gordon and his wife Juanita, that toured the US and Europe for over four years, including The Tate Museum in London.
  6. Laurie Anderson, “The telephone,” “The polaroid,” “The sheet,” “The wedding dress,” “The bathrobe” from La Visite Guidée (1994). Music: Laurie Anderson; Voice: Sophie Calle. Exhibition catalogue consisting of artist’s book and Audio CD published in conjunction with the show held March 27- 29, 1994. The work consisted of a total of 21 short compositions. We hear five consecutive tracks from the collection. This audio was provided on a cassette for the exhibit, which visitor’s played on a Sony Walkman while taking a guided tour of the Sophie Calle's exhibition Absent.
  7. Steven Vitiello. World Trade Center Recordings: Open House Bounce (1999). A recording from the 91st floor of the World Trade Center, Tower One made with contact microphones placed on the inside of the windows. This recording was only published as part of a CDR sold at an Open House Exhibition in the fall of 1999. Various recordings were made during a 6-month residency. This one in particular picked up a number of passing planes and helicopters.
  8. Various artists, Whitney Biennial 2002 (2002 Whitney Museum Of American Art). A CD was included with the 292-page hardcover catalogue "Whitney Biennial 2002" published for the same-titled exhibition at the Whitney Museum Of American Art, March 7-May 26, 2002. Four tracks are heard: Maryanne Amacher, “A Step Into It, Imagining 1001 Years Entering Ancient Rooms” (excerpt); Meredith Monk, “Eclipse,” with performers Ching Gonzalez, Katie Geissinger, Meredith Monk, Theo Bleckmann; Marina Rosenfeld, “Delusional Dub;” Tracie Morris, “Slave Sho' To Video A.k.a. Black But Beautiful.”
  9. 33 RPM: Ten Hours of Sound From France (2003 235). Exhibition companion compilation to San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Sept. 6-14, 2003, listening room program. 33 RPM consisted of ten one-hour segments that were played on a rotating schedule at the museum during the exhibition. This was the fourth installment of an ongoing series at the museum that presented sound art scene in a variety of countries. We include the following tracks from this compilation: Kasper T. Toeplitz, “PURR#2” (2003); Jean-Claude Risset, “Resonant Sound Spaces/Filters” (2002); Mimetic, “evolution” (2003); and Lionel Marchetti, “À rebours” (1989).
  10. Jane Philbrick, "Voix/e" (2003-04 SW Harbor Songline). Installation two lightboxes, with color Duratrans (large-format backlit color transparency film), 48 x 24 x 6; two inset Alpine speakers, synthesized voice track, 9 1/2 mins. looped.; two companion LCD-screen DVDs. On view at Real Art Ways, Hartford, CT, and Consolidated Works, Seattle (2004). Audio work created by Jan Philbrick at the Center for Spoken Language Understanding, Oregon Graduate Institute. The piece consists of Philbrick’s reading of the "Song of Solomon," modified and edited using voice-gendered speech synthesis to speak bride, groom, and companion parts.
  11. Marko Timlin, “Audible Light” (2017), Created by Marko Timlin, a Finnish sound artist whose work has frequently been integrated into museum installations. This installation, Audible Light, created sound directly out of light, “work inspired by Evgeny Sholpo's Variophone instrument developed in 1930.” Solo exhibition, Oksasenkatu 11 in Helsinki. Not to be confused with the 2000 museum exhibition called Audible Light at the Museum Of Modern Art, Oxford, to be featured in a future podcast.

Opening montage: sounds from the recordings of Art By Telephone (1969 Museum Of Contemporary Art Chicago) and Audio Arts: Volume 3 No 4 Side A, cassette (1977 Audio Arts).

Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz.

Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes.

For additional notes, please see my blog Noise and Notations.

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